Accommodations and Modifications

Information to assist school teams in determining if provided supports should be considered an accommodation or a modification.

What is an accommodation?

  • Changes HOW the student will learn or demonstrate his/her knowledge, keeping content expectations the same
  • Help support access to the general curriculum. 
  • Do not change what is taught.
  • Provide adaptations for a child with a disability without setting different expectations. 

What is a modification?

  • Changes WHAT the student is expected to learn
  • Perform objectives different from those of the rest of the class.
  • Adjustments to an assignment or a test that change the standard of what the test or assignment is supposed to measure.
  • Practices that change, lower, or reduce learning expectations.

The following information is intended to assist school teams in determining if provided supports should be considered an accommodation or a modification.  Please note:  A student might require an individual assignment modified and then demonstrate a full understanding of the content on a final assessment without modification.   These students may be considered to be demonstrating mastery on non-modified instruction for the Special Permission Locally Awarded Verified Credit Accommodation (SPLAVC-A).   This student may also be considered for return to in-person with group 5, Intensive Support Needs. 

Answer different or fewer test questions

  • Curriculum Expectation: Students will write a short answer explaining the classification keys used to identify rocks and minerals. (Based on Earth Science standards)
    • Accommodation Example
      • The student is provided multiple-choice questions explaining the classification keys to identify rocks and minerals.
    • Modification Example
      • The student will sort images of rocks, minerals, and organisms.
  • Curriculum Expectation: Students, given 10 questions, will solve to make the change from $5 dollars or less. (Based on Mathematics standard 3.8)
    • Accommodation Example
      • The student, given 5 questions, will solve to make the change from $5 dollars or less.
    • Modification Example
      • The student, given 5 questions, will identify a coin and the assigned value.

        OR      

        Given manipulatives, the student will solve 5 questions to make the change from 25 cents or less.

Complete fewer homework problems than peers

  • Curriculum Expectation: Students will solve 10 multistep linear equations in one variable with the variable on one or both sides of the equation. (Based on Mathematics standard 8.15)
    • Accommodation Example
      • The student is tasked to complete 3 multi-step linear equations with variables on one side of the equation. The student is given a second task to complete 3 multi-step linear equations with variables on both sides of the equation.
    • Modification Example
      • The student is tasked to complete one-step equations.    

        OR    

        The student is given the variable and tasked to complete the problem.
  • Curriculum Expectation: When given 10 problems, students will determine the slope of a line when given an equation of the line, the graph of the line, or two points on the line. (Based on Algebra standard 6.a)
    • Accommodation Example
      • When given 10 problems, the student will determine the slope of a line when given an equation of the line, the graph of the line, or two points on the line on the even numbered problems.
    • Modification Example
      • The student will draw a line on the graph when given the coordinates of two points of the line on 5 problems.

Create alternate projects or assignments

  • Curriculum Expectation: Students will draw pictures to demonstrate the relationship between force and energy. (Based on Science standard 5.3)
    • Accommodation Example
      • The student will demonstrate their understanding of the relationship between force and energy by responding orally to asked questions rather than drawing pictures.
    • Modification Example
      • When the teacher shows a video of an object in motion, the student will identify if the object is moving in a straight, circular, or spinning motion using picture cards. 

Read reduced language level text

  • Curriculum Expectation: Provided text at grade level, students will identify statements which are facts and opinions. (Based on English standard 4.5)
    • Accommodation Example
      • Provided text at student’s independent reading level, 3 years below grade level, student will identify statements which are fact and opinion.
    • Modification Example
      • Provided with statements written at the student’s independent reading level, the student will indicate if the statements are true or false.  
  • Curriculum Expectation: Provided the World History text, students will read the chapter on ancient Greece and complete the graphic organizer describing the social and religious structure of ancient Greece. (Based on World History 1 standard 5.b)
    • Accommodation Example
      • Using a website which reduces the reading level of the textbook, the student will read the chapter on ancient Greece and complete the graphic organizer describing the social and religious structure of ancient Greece.
    • Modification Example
      • After reading a book at their independent reading level, the student will identify common gods and goddesses of Ancient Greece: Zeus, Hera, Apollo, and Athena.

Use of graphic organizer

  • Curriculum Expectation: Students will write an essay to explain similarities and differences of techniques and literary forms represented in the literature of different cultures and eras, specifically: haikus, sonnets, fables, and myths. (Based on English standard 10.3.d)
    • Accommodation Example
      • The student will use a graphic organizer to show the similarities and differences of haikus, sonnets, fables, and myths.
    • Modification Example
      • Given 2 pieces of writing, the student will identify which one is a fable and which is a haiku.
         
  • Curriculum Expectation: Students will draw a diagram of the rock cycle. (Based on Science standard 5.8.c)
    • Accommodation Example
      • The student will use a graphic organizer to demonstrate the key components of the rock cycle.
    • Modification Example
      • The student will use a T-chart to indicate whether the picture/photo card presented is a rock or not.

Use recognition tests (true-false, multiple-choice, or matching) instead of essays

  • Curriculum Expectation: In an essay, students will describe the processes of photosynthesis and respiration include the capture, storage, transformation, and flow of energy. (Based on Biology standard 2.e)
    • Accommodation Example
      • The student will answer multiple-choice questions to demonstrate their knowledge of the processes of photosynthesis and respiration include the capture, storage, transformation, and flow of energy.
    • Modification Example
      • When given 10 images, the student will identify if the given image uses photosynthesis to convert light to energy by selecting True or False.  

Write shorter papers

  • Curriculum Expectation: Students will write a multi-paragraph essay that will describe the structure and powers of the local government. (Based on Civics and Economics standard 8.a)
    • Accommodation Example
      • The student will write one paragraph indicating the structure and powers of the local government.
    • Modification Example
      • Given pictures, students will label the picture with the power of the local government exemplified in the picture.  
  • Accommodations and Modifications

    This chart is intended to assist school teams in determining if provided supports should be considered an accommodation or a modification.