College Success Program Improvement and Innovation Plan

Relevant details and data for the College Success Programs

Program Overview

In accordance with FCPS Strategic Goals of Student Success, College Success Programs (CSP) uses a systemic approach to mitigate the impact of barriers to access, opportunity, and attainment and support students who are from populations that are historically underrepresented on college campuses due to adverse barriers. Some students face challenges caused by poverty, racism and lack of access to resources. Many of our CSP students are:

  • First in their families to attend college in the U.S.
  • Students with disabilities.
  • English language learners.
  • Economically disadvantaged students; regardless of race and ethnicity.
  • Black or African American students.
  • Hispanic students, of one or more race.

College Success Programs:

  • Prepare students to graduate on time and be college and career ready with equitable educational access to postsecondary education. 
  • Support CSP students through programs that equip students with the tools necessary for success in higher education.
  • Promote college readiness by offering a variety of services that include:
    • Preparing students for the academic rigor of college coursework.
    • Helping with the college application and financial process.
    • Field trips to college campuses.
    • Goal setting and career exploration.
    • Academic skill-building and monitoring of academic performance.
    • Providing enrichment and leadership activities and experiences.
  • Increase the number of students going to college or getting a career by building school, family and community partnerships that provide:
    • College-related information
    • Resources
    • Support for students and families
  • Support students graduating with post-secondary options.
  • Help students as they transition from high school to college through our Launch to College program.

Launch to College Program

Many college-intending students find themselves dealing with summer melt, especially low-income students. Many high school graduates with plans to enroll in college find it difficult to stay on course due to:

  • Insufficient financial aid
  • Missed administrative deadlines
  • Lack of support

This program is designed to ease the transition to college and support postsecondary success by providing students with academic skills and social resources needed to succeed in a college environment.

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is a national college readiness system. Their mission is to close the opportunity gap by preparing all students for college readiness and success. AVID’s goal is to ensure that students will

  • Succeed in accessing the most rigorous curriculum.
  • Participate in leadership activities within their school.
  • Increase their enrollment in and attendance at four-year colleges and universities.

The AVID College and Career Readiness Framework (PDF) makes sure that students

  • Receive intentional support and mentoring in rigorous college and career preparatory curriculum.
  • Increase their opportunity knowledge through research, goal-setting, and long-term planning.
  • Increase their own student agency. 

AVID accomplishes its mission by transforming the instruction, systems, leadership, and culture in schools. AVID takes a two-pronged approach:

  • AVID elective (MS and HS only)
  • AVID schoolwide (ES, MS, and HS).

AVID Elective

To enroll in the elective, students must apply at their school. Then students are interviewed by AVID staff. Students selected to take the AVID elective:

  • Are considered to be “in the academic middle" (GPA 2.0-3.5).
  • Demonstrate the potential to succeed in a rigorous academic program.
  • Have a desire to go to college.
  • Are often the first in their family to attend college.
  • Are from populations historically underrepresented in college.

During the elective, students receive additional academic, social, and emotional support from their AVID teacher and counselor. The teacher:

  • Implements AVID’s curriculum
  • Leads students and tutors through an inquiry-based tutorial process.
  • Supports the planning process for college visits and career-oriented guest speakers
  • Promotes the use of AVID instructional strategies in all classes schoolwide
  • Collaborates with content teachers to support student progress.

AVID tutors are interviewed and trained by district staff each year, and over 100 tutors assist students in achieving their full potential by facilitating collaborative tutorial groups to support students as they engage in rigorous curriculum, including Honors, AP, IB and DE courses.

Schoolwide Model

The core of AVID schoolwide is an instructional framework centered called WICOR:

  • Writing
  • Inquiry
  • Collaboration
  • Organization
  • Reading

WICOR offers teachers strategies and techniques that can be easily incorporated into classrooms. AVID-trained teachers engage and excite their students through student-centered learning opportunities.

In the schoolwide model, AVID is supported in schools by:

  • An AVID coordinator
  • A site team of teachers
  • Counselors and administrators dedicated to supporting students’ academic progress
  • Parents' and Guardians' involvement

Each AVID site’s coordinator:

  • Provides schools with guidance on how to implement AVID with fidelity.
  • Oversees the multi-disciplinary site team.
  • Coordinates student recruitment.
  • Plans college visits.
  • Builds ongoing AVID awareness among faculty.
  • Spreads AVID instructional strategies schoolwide.
  • Serves as a liaison between the site team and principal/district leadership.
  • Collects and monitors certification, site, and impact data.
  • Articulates AVID curriculum across grade levels.
  • Advocates for ongoing professional learning opportunities.

The AVID Leader Corps (ALC) is made up of 10 trained teachers from across the district. The ALC mentors and supports schools with implementation and training. Each school goes through an annual certification process.

Scope of Impact

AVID has been successfully implemented for over 20 years in FCPS and currently exists in 28 schools. In FY 2020, the School Board approved to provide 0.17 teacher positions for AVID Coordinators at 12 schools with the largest number of AVID students.

School Level Number of Sites Number of Students Served
ES 1 211
MS 12 1,064
HS 14 1,685

Actions and Measures
Goal 1

By June 2023, the percentage of identified student populations most in need of services (EL 11%; SWD 7%; YS 33%) participating in AVID will increase by 2%.

Actions
  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics, and Young Scholars) to increase awareness of CSP programs, ensure these students have access to college and career readiness resources and support them with the CSP program application.
  • Support: Promote intentional and culturally responsive messaging about CSP programs and resources by using multilingual tools and providing information sessions in correspondence languages to students and families.
  • Success: Intentionally work with schools to equitably increase the expansion of AVID to at least 1 Title 1 School.
Measures
  • Application rates for identified subgroups (EL, SWD, YS)
  • Acceptance rates for identified subgroups (EL, SWD, YS)
  • Participation rates for identified subgroups (EL, SWD, YS)
Goal 2

By June 2023, participation rates for AVID students in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Dual Enrollment (DE) will increase from 86% to 88%.

Actions
  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics, and Young Scholars) to share information about high-quality college and career pathways aligned with in-demand labor market opportunities, academic and career planning and academic advising with families so they’re aware of their role in assisting their children in academic planning and course selections.
  • Support: Promote interventions that support rigorous course-taking patterns and build students' agency and collaboration-  to include tutoring, mentoring, experiential learning, extra study time, and special skills sessions.
  • Success: Examine policies and practices that govern access to rigorous classes. Work with stakeholders to increase equitable access to and success in advanced courses (AP, IB, DE) for CSP students.
Measures
  • Percent of graduating seniors who participate in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Dual Enrollment (DE) courses by end of high school.

College Partnership Program

The College Partnership Program (CPP) is an enrichment program that supports students as they explore, apply to and enroll in college. CPP is designed to systematically mitigate the impact of barriers to access, opportunity, and attainment and support students who are from populations that are historically underrepresented on college campuses including:

  • Students who are the first in family to attend college in the U.S.
  • Black or African American students.
  • Hispanic students, of one or more race.
  • Students with disabilities.
  • English language learners.
  • Economically disadvantaged students.

The mission of CPP is to provide students with equitable access to postsecondary opportunities and activities necessary for college and career readiness. Using research-based strategies, CPP goals are to:

  • Develop positive engagement and build student's college aspirations.
  • Support rigorous academic preparation.
  • Complete college-going tasks.
  • Encourage early college planning.
  • Provide students with enriching opportunities and activities.
  • Provide mentoring and tutoring opportunities.
  • Support students as they explore, apply to and enroll in college.
  • Assist students with
    • Academic advising.
    • College visits.
    • Parent engagement.
    • Preparation beyond high school.

Students apply to CPP in grades 8 through 11 and many stay in the program through grade 12. Applications usually open in January and close in March. Interested students must apply by submitting applications to school-based staff who support the program. They are called CPP Advocates.

Students participating:

  • Are to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 in core classes.
  • Be willing to pursue advanced coursework.
  • Demonstrate leadership in schools and community activities.
  • Attend monthly school-based meetings.
  • Visit colleges.
  • Meet people of varying careers.
  • Gain support with
    • College admissions.
    • Financial aid.
    • The scholarship application process.

Additionally, there are family information sessions and monthly messages to families, along with a college Summer Experience.

CPP Advocates

There are approximately 80 CPP Advocates in the high schools and alternative schools; 1 per every 25 students. CPP Advocates:

  • Facilitate the monthly meetings.
  • Plan and chaperone college visits.
  • Form student panels.
  • Invite college and career guest speakers to meetings.
  • Focus on building relationships with intentional check-ins
  • Provide information and opportunities to learn about
    • College admissions
    • Financial aid
    • Sscholarships
    • SAT and ACT preparation.
  • Attend professional development.
  • Participate in the application and recruitment process working in collaboration with middle and high school staff.
  • Support families with college information and knowledge.
  • Support family information sessions and monthly messages (to families)
  • Support the three-day college Summer Experience for students.

Scope of Impact

CPP was launched in 1989 at West Potomac HS enrolling a small number of students and parents who were committed to college aspirations. In the 32 years since, CPP has expanded to 27 high schools, including 2 of the alternative schools, and serves 1,925 students.

Strategic Actions and Measures

Goal 1

By June 2023, the percentage of identified student populations most in need of services (EL 9%; SWD 9%; YS 24%) participating in CPP will increase by 2%.

Actions
  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics, and Young Scholars) to increase awareness of CSP programs, ensure these students have access to college and career readiness resources and support them with the CSP program application.
  • Support: Promote intentional and culturally responsive messaging about CSP programs and resources by using multilingual tools and providing information sessions in correspondence languages to students and families.
  • Success: Intentionally work with schools to equitably increase the expansion of CPP to at least 1 non-traditional school.
Measures
  • Application rates for identified sub groups (EL, SWD, YS)
  • Acceptance rates for identified sub groups (EL, SWD, YS)
  • Participation rates for identified sub groups (EL, SWD, YS)
Goal 2

By June 2023, participation rates for CPP students in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Dual Enrollment (DE) will increase from 84% to 86%.

Actions
  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics, and Young Scholars) to share information about high-quality college and career pathways aligned with in-demand labor market opportunities, academic and career planning and academic advising with families so they’re aware of their role in assisting their children in academic planning and course selections.
  • Support: Promote interventions that support rigorous course-taking patterns and build students' agency and collaboration-  to include tutoring, mentoring, experiential learning, extra study time, and special skills sessions.
  • Success: Examine policies and practices that govern access to rigorous classes. Work with stakeholders to increase equitable access to and success in advanced courses (AP, IB, DE) for CSP students.
Measures
  • Percent of graduating seniors who participate in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Dual Enrollment (DE) courses by end of high school.

Early Identification Program (EIP)

The Early Identification Program (EIP) is a multiyear college preparatory program for first-generation college-bound middle and high school students. It is designed to systematically mitigate the impact of barriers to access, opportunity, and attainment and support students who are from populations that are historically underrepresented on college campuses.

The mission of EIP is to inspire students towards higher education and the development of professional goals. Using a holistic approach to educate students, EIP strives to maximize student potential and academic achievement. In partnership with George Mason University (GMU) community, the goal of EIP is to improve students’ quality of life by providing:

  • Academic enrichment
  • Personal development
  • Community engagement

This gives students the knowledge and skills to become productive and responsible global citizens. EIP provides services that include:

  • An after-school tutoring or Academic Mentoring Program (AMP).
  • Saturday programs for remediation and enrichment in science and mathematics.
  • College information sessions for juniors and seniors that include guidance on
    • Completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
    • Writing their college essays.
    • Filling out college applications.
  • A mandatory Strengthening the Family workshop for the parents and guardians of EIP students.
  • A mandatory, three-week Summer Academy during July on the Fairfax campus of GMU for rising 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th graders.
  • A cohort of fellow-EIP students and family members who encourage and support one another.

Transportation is provided for students for many of the EIP events.

Seventh grade students are nominated by school staff in January. Once nominated, students and their parents attend an information meeting where

  • Program specifics are explained.
  • Applications are distributed.

Students apply for EIP only in the 7th grade and stay in the program for 5 years until they graduate from high school. Applications are usually open in March and close in April. EIP students maintaining a 3.2 GPA are guaranteed admission to GMU. Those who maintain a 3.5 GPA are invited to apply for a GMU scholarship.

There are 13 EIP Sponsors, one in each school. Many of them are school counselors and teachers. EIP Sponsors:

  • Supervise AMP sessions.
  • Provide support with communication of events.
  • Participate in the recruitment, nomination, and application process.
  • Support students in the college application process and applying for financial aid and scholarships.
  • Receive training sessions to include:
    • EIP orientation.
    • The nomination process.
    • AMP Monitoring.
    • Relationship building.
    • The application review process.

Scope of Impact

EIP is a longstanding partnership between FCPS and GMU that started in 1987. Since then it has expanded to 13 FCPS schools.

School Level Number of Schools Number of Students Served by EIP
MS 7 62
HS 6 200

 

Strategic Actions and Measures

Goal 1

By June 2023, the percentage of identified student populations most in need of services (EL 5%: SWD 5%: YS 45%) participating in EIP will increase by 2%.

Actions
  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics, and Young Scholars) to increase awareness of CSP programs, ensure these students have access to college and career readiness resources and support them with the CSP program application.
  • Support: Promote intentional and culturally responsive messaging about CSP programs and resources by using multilingual tools and providing information sessions in correspondence languages to students and families.
  • Success: Intentionally work with schools to equitably increase the expansion of EIP to at least 1 middle and at least 1 high school.
Measures
  • Application rates for identified subgroups (EL, SWD, YS)
  • Acceptance rates for identified subgroups (EL, SWD, YS)
  • Participation rates for identified subgroups (EL, SWD, YS)
Goal 2

By June 2023, participation rates for EIP students who enroll in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Dual Enrollment (DE) will increase from 80% to 82%.

Actions
  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics, and Young Scholars) to share information about high-quality college and career pathways aligned with in-demand labor market opportunities, academic and career planning and academic advising with families so they’re aware of their role in assisting their children in academic planning and course selections.
  • Support: Promote interventions that support rigorous course-taking patterns and build students' agency and collaboration-  to include tutoring, mentoring, experiential learning, extra study time, and special skills sessions.
  • Success: Examine policies and practices that govern access to rigorous classes. Work with stakeholders to increase equitable access to and success in advanced courses (AP, IB, DE) for CSP students.
Measures
  • Percent of graduating seniors who participate in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Dual Enrollment (DE) courses by end of high school.

Scope of Impact

College Success Programs (CSP) serves 41 schools at elementary, middle and high schools, including alternative high schools. We also offer workshops and events to support all students. In 2020-21 of the 5493 students in CSP:

  • 86.8% are of students are students of color.
  • 63.2% are on free and reduced lunches.
  • 7.7% are English Learners.
  • 9.2% are students with disabilities. 
Program School Level Number of Sites Number of Students Served
AVID K-12 27 2,726
CPP 9-12 27 1,874
EIP 8-12 13 239
Pathway* 12+ 16 704

*Pathway to Baccalaureate (Pathway), a partnership between Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS), and Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) has served students in 16 FCPS high schools since 2005. The program is currently being restructured. While Pathway will no longer exist, FCPS and NOVA are committed to a continued partnership, and NOVA will continue to support students in FCPS

Subgroup Data

The tables below show the percent of students participating in CSP compared to the percent of students in FCPS by subgroups.

Gender CSP FCPS
Female 62.6% 48%
Male 37.4% 52%

Ethnicity

Ethnicity CSP FCPS
White 13.2% 36.8%
Black 23.7% 10%
Hispanic 45.1% 27.1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0.3% 0.3%
Asian 14.9% 19.8%
Two or More 2.7% 5.9%
Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander 0.1% 0.1%

Other

  CSP FCPS
English Learners 7.7% 26.8%
Students with Disabilities 9.2% 14.4%
Free and Reduced Meals 63.2% 27.8%

Strategic Actions and Measures

Updated for 2022 - 23 school year.

Goal 1

By June 2023, the percentage of identified student populations most in need of services (EL 10%; SWD 8%; YS 30%) participating in CSP will increase by 2%.

Actions

  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics and Young Scholars) to increase awareness of CSP programs, ensure these students have access to college and career readiness resources and support them with the CSP program application.
  • Support: Promote intentional and culturally responsive messaging about CSP programs and resources by using multilingual tools and providing information sessions in correspondence languages to students and families.
  • Success: Intentionally work with schools to equitably increase expansion of AVID to at least 1 Title 1 School, EIP to at least 1 middle and at least 1 high school and CPP to at least 1 non traditional school.

Measures

  • Application rates for identified sub groups (EL, SWD, YS)
  • Acceptance rates for identified sub groups (EL, SWD, YS)
  • Participation rates for identified sub groups (EL, SWD, YS)

Goal 2

By June 2023, participation rates for CSP students in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Dual Enrollment (DE) will increase from 85% to 87%.

Actions

  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics and Young Scholars) to share information about high-quality college and career pathways aligned with in-demand labor market opportunities, academic and career planning and academic advising with families so they’re aware of their role in assisting their children in academic planning and course selections.
  • Support: Promote interventions that support rigorous course-taking patterns and build students agency and collaboration-  to include tutoring, mentoring, experiential learning, extra study time and special skills sessions.
  • Success: Examine policies and practices that govern access to rigorous classes. Work with stakeholders to increase equitable access to and success in advanced courses (AP, IB, DE) for CSP students.

Measures

  • Percent of graduating seniors who participate in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Dual Enrollment (DE) courses by end of high school.

Goal 3

By June 2023, participation rates for CSP students in Algebra 1 by 8th grade will increase from 53% to 57%.

Actions

  • Access: Collaborate with key stakeholders (School Counseling, College and Career Specialists, Family and School Partnerships, ESOL Services, Special Education, Advanced Academics, and Young Scholars) to ensure students, staff and families understand open enrollment, academic advising, and the importance of students accessing Algebra 1 by end of 8th grade) which is the gateway for students taking higher level math before graduation and increased access to post-secondary options. This sets them up for advanced coursework and is a requirement of many four-year colleges.
  • Support: Promote interventions that support rigorous course-taking patterns and build students' agency and collaboration-  to include tutoring, mentoring, experiential learning, extra study time, and special skills sessions.
  • Success: Collaborate with ISD Mathematics Department to create network improvement communities (AANIC) with six schools (Hayfield, Jackson, Key, Kilmer, and Whitman) for the purpose of increasing the diverse representation of students who participate and are proficient in Algebra 1 by the end of 8th grade. This network is a multi-year commitment whereby participating schools will engage in a process of examining school-level data related to mathematics participation and proficiency, investigating and evaluating strategies to increase participation while maintaining proficiency, and planning to implement and monitor changes through the 2024-25 school year.

Measures

  • Percent of students who participate in Algebra I by 8th grade.

Together, the CSP programs promote college readiness by offering a variety of services that include: assistance with the college application and financial process; field trips to college campuses; goal setting and career exploration; academic skill-building; and monitoring of academic performance. CSP also builds school, family and community partnerships that provide college-related information, resources, and support for students and families which increases college and career going.