Secondary Social Studies Essential Standards

School Year 2020-21

For the FCPS Return to School in 2020-21, the standards listed below emphasize the central priorities for learning in each course. These standards are intended to guide instruction and assessment during this extraordinary school year.

High school standards also include standards from the Teaching Tolerance Anti-bias Framework (PDF) to support anti-bias education.

Honors

Unit guides provided to teachers contain recommended extensions for students enrolled in the honors course option. 

Year Long Standards

These standards are the central priorities for learning in the course. They are prioritized in planning, teaching, assessing, and intervening to ensure student success over the course of the year.

US History (Grade 7)

  • Analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history.
  • Use evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations.
  • Compare and contrast historical, cultural and political  perspectives in United States history.
  • Determine cause and effect relationships in United States history.
  • Make connections across time and place.
  • Research and investigate to develop products orally and in writing.

Civics

  • Analyze and interpret evidence from primary and secondary sources, including charts, graphs, and political cartoons.
  • Determine the accuracy and validity of information by separating fact and opinion and recognizing bias
  • Construct informed, evidence-based arguments from multiple perspectives and multiple sources. 
  • Analyze cause and effect relationships and make connections over time to help them understand current and future demographic, political and economic events.
  • Take informed action to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues in support of the Common Good.
  • Use a systematic approach when making decisions, including weighing the costs and benefits of a specific choice.

World History and Geography 1

  • Synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in world history.
  • Interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history.
  • Comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, social, and political perspectives in world history.
  • Analyzing multiple connections across time and place.
  • Examine what they learn critically, attending to power, position, and bias
  • Connect their identities, communities and/or the world to their learning.

World History and Geography 2

  • Synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in world history.
  • Interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history.
  • Comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, social, and political perspectives in world history
  • Analyzing multiple connections across time and place.
  • Examine what they learn critically, attending to power, position, and bias
  • Connect their identities, communities and/or the world to their learning.

VA/US History

  • Synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in world history.
  • Interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history.
  • Comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, social, and political perspectives in world history.
  • Analyzing multiple connections across time and place.
  • Examine what they learn critically, attending to power, position, and bias.
  • Connect their identities, communities and/or the world to their learning.

VA/US Government

  • Planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources.
  • Constructing informed, analytic arguments, using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims.
  • Taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues.
  • Applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions and effective participation in civic life.
  • Examine what they learn critically, attending to power, position, and bias
  • Connect their identities, communities and/or the world to their learning.

Quarter 1 (September 8 – October 30)

US History (Grade 7)

  • Introduced to skills for historical thinking, geographic analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship. 
  • Make connections across time through an examination of current events.  
  • Apply social science skills to
    • understand that the Civil War divided the country, resulting in loss of life, homes and businesses.  The country needed to be rebuilt to mend not only the physical landscape, but also relationships between peoples’ with an emphasis on formerly enslaved African Americans.
    • analyze the impact of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendment to the Constitution and how they changed the meaning of citizenship. 
    • describe the impact of Reconstruction on the North and South with a focus on the effects of federal government policies on formerly enslaved people
    • describe the end of Reconstruction and its impact on the North and South 
    • describe how the post-Reconstruction South led to systemic racism against African Americans, begun with the institutionalization of Jim Crow Laws.
    • explain that the settlement of the Great Plains occurred after the Civil War as people's perceptions of the Great Plains changed as a result of inventions and adaptations.
    • examine how Westward expansion impacted the lifestyle of American Indians 
    • identify new technologies in the post-World War II era to assess the impact on American life and demonstrate an understanding over change over time. 
       

Civics (Grade 8)

  • Introduction to skills for historical thinking, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship. 
  • Examine current events to gain a greater understanding of government and economics.  
  • Apply social science skills to understand citizenship and the rights, duties, responsibilities and personal character traits of citizens and residents by:
    • Describing the processes by which an individual becomes a citizen of the United States.
    • Describing the First Amendment freedoms of religion,= speech, press, assembly, and petition, and the rights guaranteed by due process and equal protection of the laws.
    • Describing the duties of citizenship, including obeying the laws, paying taxes, defending the nation, and serving in court.
    • Examining the responsibilities of citizenship, including registering and voting, communicating with government officials, participating in political campaigns, keeping informed about current issues, and respecting differing opinions in a diverse society.
    • Evaluating how civic and social duties address community needs and serve the public good.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the political process at the local, state, and national levels of government by:
    • Describing the functions of political parties;.
    • Comparing and contrasting the similarities and differences of political parties.
    • Evaluating and explaining the role of campaign contributions and costs.
    • Examining the history of and requirements for voter registration and participation, including the barriers to voting.
    • Evaluating the effectiveness of the Electoral College in the election of the president and vice president.
  • Apply social science skills to understand how public policy is made at the local, state, and national levels of government by:
    • Examining the impact of the media on public opinion and public policy.
    • Describing how individuals and interest groups influence public policy.
    • Describing the impact of international issues and events on local decision making..

World History and Geography 1

  • Demonstrate history and social science thinking skills and practices, with an emphasis on the concepts of power, position, bias, and agency, and apply them to their learning regarding their identities, communities, states, the nation, and  the world.
    • Develop language and historical and cultural knowledge that affirm and accurately describe their membership in multiple identity groups.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the period from the Paleolithic Era to the agricultural revolution, including technological and social developments, and examine the changing understanding of societies in the past and present.
    • Respectfully express curiosity about the history and lived experiences of others and will exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way.
    • Recognize traits of the dominant culture, their home culture and other cultures and understand how they negotiate their own identity in multiple spaces.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the cultural patterns of ancient river valley civilizations, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and China and the civilizations of the Hebrews and Phoenicians, including the development and interactions of religious traditions (including Judaisim) in order to understand their impact in the contemporary world.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
    • Identify figures, groups, events and a variety of strategies and philosophies relevant to the history of social justice around the world.
  • Use social science skills in order to understand each civilizations’ beliefs, traditions, customs, and contributions - Persia (Zoroastrianism), India (Hinduism and Buddhism), and China (Confucianism and Taoism)- and connect that learning to their identities, communities, and/or the world.
    • Respectfully express curiosity about the history and lived experiences of others and will exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way.
    • Express empathy when people are excluded or mistreated because of their identities and concern when they themselves experience bias

World History and Geography 2

  • Demonstrate history and social science thinking skills and practices, with an emphasis on the concepts of power, position, bias, and agency, and  apply them to their learning regarding their identities, communities, states, the nation, and  the world.
    • Develop language and historical and cultural knowledge that affirm and accurately describe their membership in multiple identity groups. 
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in the world about 1500 C.E. to make connections across time and place and apply their understanding to their identities and the contemporary world.
    • Recognize traits of the dominant culture, their home culture and other cultures and understand how they negotiate their own identity in multiple spaces.
    • Respectfully express curiosity about the history and lived experiences of others and will exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way. 
  • Apply social science skills to understand the cultural and economic conditions in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa from about 1500 C.E. to about 1800 C.E. and  examine what they learn critically, attending to power, position, bias, and/or agency.
    • Respond to diversity by building empathy, respect, understanding and connection.
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the social, political, economic, and cultural ideas of the European Renaissance and the Reformation and  apply their understanding to their identities and the contemporary world.
    • Respectfully express curiosity about the history and lived experiences of others and will exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way.
    • Recognize that power and privilege influence relationships on interpersonal, intergroup and institutional levels and consider how they have been affected by those dynamics.

VA/US History

  • Demonstrate history and social science thinking skills and practices, with an emphasis on the concepts of power, position, bias, and agency, and  apply them to their learning regarding their identities, communities, states, the nation, and  the world.
    • Develop language and historical and cultural knowledge that affirm and accurately describe their membership in multiple identity groups. 
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the impact of the European Age of Exploration by analyzing the cultural interactions among American Indians, Europeans, and Africans, with a focus on the influence of power, position, privilege, and/or agency in the development of the 13 colonies. 
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
    • Recognize that power and privilege influence relationships on interpersonal, intergroup and institutional levels and consider how they have been affected by those dynamics.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the issues and events leading to and during the Revolutionary Period by critically evaluating the principles and legacies of the foundational documents of the United States upon students’ identities, communities, and/or the world.
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today.
    • Speak up with courage and respect when they or someone else has been hurt or wronged by bias.

VA/US Government

  • Demonstrate history and social science thinking skills and practices, with an emphasis on the concepts of power, position, bias, and agency, and  apply them to their learning regarding their identities, communities, states, the nation, and  the world.
    • Develop language and historical and cultural knowledge that affirm and accurately describe their membership in multiple identity groups. 
    • Respectfully express curiosity about the history and lived experiences of others and will exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the political philosophies that shaped the development of Virginia and United States constitutional government with an emphasis on the concepts of power, position, bias, and agency.
    • Recognize that power and privilege influence relationships on interpersonal, intergroup and institutional levels and consider how they have been affected by those dynamics.
    • Express empathy when people are excluded or mistreated because of their identities and concern when they themselves experience bias.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the federal system of government described in the Constitution of the United States with an emphasis on the concepts of power, position, bias, and agency.
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today.
    • Recognize their own responsibility to stand up to exclusion, prejudice and injustice.
  • Apply social science skills to understand local, state, and national elections, the role of parties on policy making  and their impact upon students’ identities, communities, states, the nation, and/or the world.
    • Develop language and historical and cultural knowledge that affirm and accurately describe their membership in multiple identity groups.
    • Recognize unfairness on the individual level (e.g., biased speech) and injustice at the institutional or systemic level (e.g., discrimination).

Quarter 2 (November 2 – January 22)

US History (Grade 7)

Apply social science skills to:

  • Explain that industrialization had both positive and negative effects on society.
  • Evaluate and explain the impact of globalization and international trade on American life.
  • Analyze how population changes and growth of cities produced cultural conflict and challenges in urban areas, including discrimination 
  • Evaluate and explain immigration patterns and immigration policy during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty first centuries.
  • Explain that the effects of industrialization and immigration led to reforms during the Progressive Movement.
  • Evaluate and explain environmental policy during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty first centuries.
  • Understand the changing role of the United States from the late nineteenth century through World War I by
    • explaining the reasons for and results of the Spanish-American War.
    • evaluating and explaining the reasons for the United States’ involvement in World War I and its international leadership role at the conclusion of the war.
       

Civics (Grade 8)

Apply social science skills to:

  • Understand the foundations of American constitutional government by
    • examining and evaluating the impact of the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution of Virginia and the Constitution of the United States, including the Bill of Rights;
    • describing the purposes for the Constitution of the United States as stated in its Preamble;
    • examining the process for amending the Constitution of Virginia and the Constitution of the United States.
    • explaining the fundamental principles of consent of the governed, limited government, rule of law, democracy, and representative government.  
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the national level by explaining the principles of separation of powers & checks & balances
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the state level by explaining the relationship of state governments to the national government in the federal system.
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the national level by:
    • analyzing the structure and powers of the legislative branch; and 
    • describing the influences on the lawmaking process.  
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the state level by describing the structure and powers of the legislative branch of Virginia.
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the local level by describing the structure and powers of the local government.
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the national level by  analyzing the structure and powers of the executive branch. 
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the state level by 
    • describing the structure and powers of the executive branch of Virginia; and 
    • describing the primary issues in the legislative process at the state level.  
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the local level by describing the structure and powers of the local government.
  • Understand the judicial system established by the Constitution of Virginia and the Constitution of the United States by: 
    • understanding that the United States has a dual court system, which consists of federal courts whose organization and jurisdiction are derived from the Constitution of the United States and federal laws, and state courts, like Virginia, whose organization and jurisdiction are derived from Virginia’s constitution and state laws;
    • describing the exercise of judicial review 

World History and Geography 1

  • Apply social science skills to understand ancient Greece in terms of its impact on Western civilization through the comparison of the cities of Athens and Sparta with emphasis on the significance of citizenship and the development of democracy and connect the learning to students' identities, communities, and/or the world.
    • Recognize traits of the dominant culture, their home culture and other cultures and understand how they negotiate their own identity in multiple spaces. 
    • Recognize that power and privilege influence relationships on interpersonal, intergroup and institutional levels and consider how they have been affected by those dynamics.
  • Apply social science skills to understand ancient Rome from about 700 B.C.E. to 500 C.E. in terms of its impact on Western civilization by comparing the social, cultural and political structures of the Roman Republic with those of the Roman Empire to analyze their influences on contemporary systems.
    • Recognize that people’s multiple identities interact and create unique and complex individuals. 
    • Recognize that power and privilege influence relationships on interpersonal, intergroup and institutional levels and consider how they have been affected by those dynamics.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the influence of the Byzantine Empire on Eastern Europe culture by analyzing the importance of Constantinople, the expansion of the Byzantine economy, and compare it to modern globalized economies in order to examine what they learn critically, attending to power, position, and bias.
    • Recognize traits of the dominant culture, their home culture and other cultures and understand how they negotiate their own identity in multiple spaces. 
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.

World History and Geography 2

  • Apply social science skills to understand the impact of the European Age of Exploration and analyze the long term effects on these areas to inform their understanding of and impact on contemporary society. 
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today
    • Express empathy when people are excluded or mistreated because of their identities and concern when they themselves experience bias.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in Europe and the Americas from about 1500  to about 1800 and apply their understanding to their identities and the contemporary world.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
    • Identify figures, groups, events and a variety of strategies and philosophies relevant to the history of social justice around the world.
  • Apply social science skills to analyze the effect of the Industrial Revolution the relationship between  industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism and examine what they learn critically, attending to power, position, bias, and/or agency.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today.

VA/US History

  • Apply social science skills to understand major events in Virginia and United States history during the first half of the nineteenth century by evaluating the cultural, economic, social,  and political issues that divided the nation and how those issues impact the present.
    • Recognize unfairness on the individual level (e.g., biased speech) and injustice at the institutional or systemic level (e.g., discrimination).
    • Express empathy when people are excluded or mistreated because of their identities and concern when they themselves experience bias.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the Civil War and Reconstruction eras and their significance, including the adoption of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, on students’ identities, communities,  and the world.
    • Recognize unfairness on the individual level (e.g., biased speech) and injustice at the institutional or systemic level (e.g., discrimination).
    • Express empathy when people are excluded or mistreated because of their identities and concern when they themselves experience bias.

VA/US Government

  • Apply social science skills to understand local, state, and national campaigns and elections and their impact upon students’ identities, communities, states, the nation, and/or the world.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified
    • Recognize their own responsibility to stand up to exclusion, prejudice and injustice.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the organization and powers of the national government by examining the federal system of government described in the Constitution of the United States defining the legislative branch and its impact upon students’ identities, communities, states, the nation, and/or the world.
    • Recognize that power and privilege influence relationships on interpersonal, intergroup and institutional levels and consider how they have been affected by those dynamics.
    • Plan and carry out collective action against bias and injustice in the world and will evaluate what strategies are most effective.

Quarter 3 (January 25 – March 26)

US History (Grade 7)

  • Apply social science skills to
    • Describe the social and economic changes that took place including Prohibition and the Great Migration.
    • Examine art, music, and literature from the 1920s and 1930s with emphasis on the Harlem Renaissance.
    • Analyze the causes of the Great Depression, its impact on Americans, and the major features of Roosevelt’s New Deal.
    • Explain the causes and events that led to American involvement in the war.
    • Locate and describe the major events and turning points of the war in Europe and the Pacific.
    • Explain and evaluate the impact of the war on the home front.

Civics (Grade 8)

  • Apply social science skills to
    • Understand the American constitutional government at the state level by explaining the primary responsibilities of state government.  
  • Understand the American constitutional government at the local level by describing the defined and limited powers exercised by local government.  
  • Explaining the relationship of local government to the state government of Virginia.
  • Understand how economic decisions are made in the marketplace by 
    • explaining that because of scarcity, consumers, producers, and governments must make choices, understanding that everyone’s choice has an opportunity cost; and
    • comparing and contrasting how traditional, free market, command, and mixed economies decide how to allocate their limited resources.
  • Understand the United States economy by describing how in a market economy supply and demand determine price.  
  • Understand the United States economy by: 
    • describing the characteristics of the United States economy, including limited government, private property, profit, markets, consumer sovereignty, and competition;
    • explaining the circular flow that shows how consumers (households),  businesses  (producers), and markets interact;
    • analyzing the relationship of the United States to the global economy, with emphasis on the impact of technological innovations

World History and Geography 1

  • Apply social science skills to understand the Islamic civilization from about 600 to 1000 including the cultural and scientific contributions and achievements of Islamic civilizations and their impact on contemporary society.
    • Respectfully express curiosity about the history and lived experiences of others and will exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way.
    • Recognize stereotypes and relate to people as individuals rather than representatives of groups.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the civilizations and empires of Asia with emphasis on Japan and China by:examining technological advances and transfers, networks of economic interdependence and cultural interactions that focus on themes of power, position, bias, and/or agency.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
    • Recognize stereotypes and relate to people as individuals rather than representatives of groups.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the civilizations and empires of Africa evaluating and explaining factors contributing to the European interactions with these societies that focus on themes of power, position, bias, and/or agency.
    • Respectfully express curiosity about the history and lived experiences of others and will exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way.
    • Recognize stereotypes and relate to people as individuals rather than representatives of groups.

World History and Geography 2

  • Apply social science skills to understand World War I and its impact on students’ identities, communities, and the world. 
    • Recognize unfairness on the individual level (e.g., biased speech) and injustice at the institutional or systemic level (e.g., discrimination).
    • Recognize their own responsibility to stand up to exclusion, prejudice and injustice
  • Apply social science skills to understand World War II and its worldwide impact, including the Holocaust and other examples of genocide in the twentieth century; and to recognize power, position, agency, and bias in the past and present.
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today.
    • Speak up with courage and respect when they or someone else has been hurt or wronged by bias.
  • Apply essential standards to understand the conflicts during the second half of the twentieth century by examining the causes, events, and effects of the Cold War and apply their understanding to their identities and the contemporary world.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
    • Identify figures, groups, events and a variety of strategies and philosophies relevant to the history of social justice around the world. 

VA/US History

  • Apply social science skills to understand key events during the 1920s and 1930s by examining and evaluating how Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal measures addressed the Great Depression and the impact it has on students’ understanding of the present.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
    • Recognize that power and privilege influence relationships on interpersonal, intergroup and institutional levels and consider how they have been affected by those dynamics.
  • Apply social science skills to understand World War II including   the contributions of diverse groups, the treatment of civilians, the impact of the Holocaust, and the deicsion to use nuclear weapons and how the war impacts students’ identiites and understanding of the present.
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today.
    • Recognize their own responsibility to stand up to exclusion, prejudice and injustice
  • Apply social science skills to critically examine and evaluate the United States’ actions and roles during the Cold War domestically and globally (including the United Nations) and the impact it has on students’ understanding of the present. 
    • Identify figures, groups, events and a variety of strategies and philosophies relevant to the history of social justice around the world.
    • Recognize their own responsibility to stand up to exclusion, prejudice and injustice.

VA/US Government

  • Apply social science skills to understand the organization and powers of the national government by examining the federal system of government described in the Constitution of the United States defining the executive branch and its impact upon students’ identities, communities, states, the nation, and/or the world.
    • Recognize unfairness on the individual level (e.g., biased speech) and injustice at the institutional or systemic level (e.g., discrimination).
    • Make principled decisions about when and how to take a stand against bias and injustice in their everyday lives and will do so despite negative peer or group pressure.
  • Apply social science skills to understand the organization and powers of the national government by examining the federal system of government described in the Constitution of the United States defining the judicial branch and its impact upon students’ identities, communities, states, the nation, and/or the world 
    • Recognize unfairness on the individual level (e.g., biased speech) and injustice at the institutional or systemic level (e.g., discrimination).
    • Speak up with courage and respect when they or someone else has been hurt or wronged by bias.
  • Apply social science skills to understand civil liberties and civil rights and their impact upon students’ identities, communities, states, the nation, and/or the world.
    • Recognize traits of the dominant culture, their home culture and other cultures and understand how they negotiate their own identity in multiple spaces. 
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today.

Quarter 4 (April 5 – June 11)

US History (Grade 7)

  • Apply social science skills to
    • Analyze how the Allied victory in WWII led to the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as global superpowers with an enhanced role in world affairs, including the formation of the United Nations.
    • Explain that the United States and Soviet Union had a rivalry over ideology and national security.
    • Examine the impact of the Civil Rights Movement, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the changing role of women on all Americans.
    • Evaluate and explain the impact international trade and globalization on American life.
    • Evaluate and explain American foreign policy, immigration, the global environment and other emerging issues in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Civics (Grade 8)

  • Apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the United States economy by 
    • examining competition in the marketplace;
    • how local, state, and federal governments allocate their budgets and collect taxes to pay for goods and services they provide;
    • describing how governments regulate to protect consumers, labor, the environment, competition in the marketplace, and property rights.
  • Aply social science skills to understand personal finance and career opportunities, with a focus on self-assessment.   
  • Demonstrate an understanding of world geography.

World History and Geography 1

  • Apply social science skills  to understand the major civilizations of the Western Hemisphere, including the Mayan, Aztec, and Incan and analyze interactions with Europeans to inform their understanding of themselves and the contemporary world.
    • Express comfort with people who are both similar to and different from them and engage respectfully with all people
    • Analyze the harmful impact of bias and injustice on the world, historically and today.
  • Apply social science skills to examine the social, economic,political and cultural systems, challenges, and achievements of Europe’s medieval and Renaissance periods and apply their understanding to themselves and the contemporary world.  
    • Identify figures, groups, events and a variety of strategies and philosophies relevant to the history of social justice around the world.
    • Make principled decisions about when and how to take a stand against bias and injustice in their everyday lives and will do so despite negative peer or group pressure.

World History and Geography 2

  • Apply social science skills to understand the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of independence movements and development efforts and to recognize power, position, agency, and bias in the past and present.
    • Respectfully express curiosity about the history and lived experiences of others and will exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way.
    • Identify figures, groups, events and a variety of strategies and philosophies relevant to the history of social justice around the world. 
  • Apply social science skills to understand the global changes and continuities during the early twenty-first century and apply their understanding to their identities, communities, and the world.
    • Recognize that power and privilege influence relationships on interpersonal, intergroup and institutional levels and consider how they have been affected by those dynamics.
    • Plan and carry out collective action against bias and injustice in the world and will evaluate what strategies are most effective.

VA/US History

  • Apply social science skills to understand the social, political, and cultural movements and changes in the United States during the second half of the twentieth century and its impact on students’ identities, communities, and the world.  
    • Recognize that people’s multiple identities interact and create unique and complex individuals.
    • Recognize unfairness on the individual level (e.g., biased speech) and injustice at the institutional or systemic level (e.g., discrimination).
  • Apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century and its impact on students’ identities, communities, and the world. 
    • Recognize traits of the dominant culture, their home culture and other cultures and understand how they negotiate their own identity in multiple spaces. 
    • Plan and carry out collective action against bias and injustice in the world and will evaluate what strategies are most effective.

VA/US Government

  • Apply social science skills to understand US foreign policy and how world governments  compare and contrast with the government of the United State and how both impact  students’ identities, communities, states, the nation, and/or the world.
    • Examine diversity in social, cultural, political and historical contexts rather than in ways that are superficial or oversimplified.
    • Identify figures, groups, events and a variety of strategies and philosophies relevant to the history of social justice around the world. 
  • Apply social science skills to understand the role of government in Virginia.  Students will be able to accurately determine their connection to the various iterations and decision-making of their local government with an emphasis on the concepts of power, position, bias, and agency.
    • Demonstrate awareness of the advantages and disadvantages they have in society because of their membership in different identity groups, and know how this has affected their lives.
    • Take responsibility for standing up to exclusion, prejudice and injustice.
  • Apply social science skills to understand economic systems and how they impact  students’ identities, communities, states, the nation, and/or the world.
    • Recognize unfairness on the individual level (e.g., biased speech) and injustice at the institutional or systemic level (e.g., discrimination).
    • Express empathy when people are excluded or mistreated because of their identities and concern when they themselves experience bias.