Grade 4 Essential Standards

School Year 2020-21

For the FCPS Return to School in 2020-21, the standards listed below emphasize the central priorities for learning in each course. These standards are intended to guide instruction and assessment during this extraordinary school year.

Quarter 1 (September 8 – October 30)

Language Arts

Becoming a Community of Readers and Writers (5 weeks)

  • Reflect on their habits and needs and plan ways to increase productivity and engagement.
  • Engage in conversations to understand other perspectives and shape their ideas.
  • Work toward flexible thinking, using discussion to uncover layers of meaning.
  • Match their choice of genre and form with the purpose of their writing.
  • Reflect on and explore the topics, ideas, and stories that matter most to them.
  • Use knowledge of roots, affixes, synonyms, antonyms, and homophones to determine the meaning of new words.

Stories: Fiction (7 weeks)

  • Develop ideas and theories about characters by tracking their internal and external journeys.
  • Use discussion to understand the perspectives of others.
  • Analyze the choices writers and illustrators make to construct power, position, and perspectives.
  • Create and utilize a process that helps students compose a story.
  • Use narrative writing techniques to strengthen their story and develop their message.

Mathematics

Addition and Subtraction (5 weeks)

  • Read, write, and identify the place and value of each digit in a nine-digit whole number.  
  • Compare and order whole numbers expressed through millions.
  • Round whole numbers expressed through millions to the nearest thousand, ten thousand, and hundred thousand.
  • Estimate and determine sums, differences, and products of whole numbers.
  • Create and solve single-step and multistep addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems with whole numbers.
  • Identify, describe, create, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables.
  • Recognize the meaning of equality in an equation.
  • Prior Supporting Essential Standards:
    • Read, write and the place value of each digit in a six-digit whole number, with and without models.
    • Addition and Subtraction (September 8-October 9; 5 weeks total)
    • Read, write, and identify the place and value of each digit in a nine-digit whole number.  
    • Compare and order whole numbers expressed through millions.
    • Round whole numbers expressed through millions to the nearest thousand, ten thousand, and hundred thousand.
    • Estimate and determine sums, differences, and products of whole numbers.
    • Create and solve single-step and multistep addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems with whole numbers.
    • Identify, describe, create, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables.
    • Recognize the meaning of equality in an equation. 
    • Prior Supporting Essential Standards:
    • Read, write and the place value of each digit in a six-digit whole number, with and without models.
    • Round whole numbers, 9,999 or less, to the nearest ten, hundred, and thousand.
    • Compare and order whole numbers each 9,999 or less.
    • Estimate and determine the sum or difference of two whole numbers.
    • Create and solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving sums or differences of two whole numbers, each 9,999 or less.
    • Identify, describe, create, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables.
    • Create equations to represent equivalent mathematical relationships.

Fractions Part 1 (7 weeks)

  • Compare and order fractions and mixed numbers, with and without models.
  • Represent equivalent fractions.

Advanced Math**

Characteristics of Numbers (4 weeks)

  • Identify and describe the characteristics of prime and composite numbers.
  • Identify and describe the characteristics of even and odd numbers.        

Fraction and Decimal Number Sense (6 weeks)

  • Compare and order fractions and mixed numbers, with and without models. 
  • Represent equivalent fractions. 
  • Identify the division statement that represents a fraction, with models and in context.  
  • Given a decimal through thousandths, round to the nearest whole number, tenth, or hundredth 
  • Represent and identify equivalencies among fractions and decimals, with and without models 
  • Compare and order fractions, mixed numbers, and/or decimals, in a given set, from least to greatest and greatest to least 

**Students will learn about Geometry during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources

Science

Virginia Ecosystems (8 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Asking questions and defining problems
    • Developing and using models
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanations
  • Investigate and understand that:
    • Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem
    • Interrelationships exist in populations, communities, and ecosystems
    • Virginia has important natural resources including watersheds and water, minerals, rocks, and ores
    • Changes in an organism’s niche and habitat may occur at various stages in its life cycle.

Social Studies

Civics (2 weeks)

  • Demonstrate responsible citizenship, both on and offline, and construct an understanding of the Student Rights and Responsibilities (including Digital Citizenship) by showing respect for rules and laws while collaborating, compromising, and participating in classroom activities.
  • Understand the significance of Constitution Day and the establishment of a new American nation through the ideas of George Mason and the Virginia Declaration of Rights.

Virginia’s Geography (3 weeks)

  • Understand where Virginia, its bordering states, and bodies of water are in the context of our world.
  • Locate, describe, and compare Virginia's 5 regions
    • Coastal Plain
    • Piedmont
    • Blue Ridge Mountains
    • Valley and Ridge
    • Appalachian Plateau. 
  • Locate and evaluate Virginia's water features to explain their impact on early Virginia and beyond
    • Atlantic Ocean
    • Chesapeake Bay
    • James River
    • York River
    • Rappahannock River
    • Potomac River.

Native Peoples of Virginia (3 weeks)

  • Locate the 3 American Indian language groups (Algonquian, Siouan, Iroquoian) on a map of Virginia.
  • Explain and analyze how Virginia's early Native Peoples adapted to the environment and climate to meet their daily needs: food, clothing, and shelter.
  • Describe the lives of Native Peoples in Virginia today, making connections between the past and present.

Quarter 2 (November 2 – January 22)

Language Arts

Stories: Fiction ( 7 weeks)

  • Develop ideas and theories about characters by tracking their internal and external journey.
  • Use discussion to understand the perspectives of others.
  • Create and utilize a process that helps them compose their story.
  • Use narrative writing techniques and the support of the community to strengthen their story and develop their message. 
  • Readers and writers use context to clarify meanings of unfamiliar words.
  • Readers and writers use knowledge of roots and affixes to determine the meaning of new words.

Nonfiction (6 weeks)

  • Adjust their thinking based on how the author presents and organizes information in order to understand the information and messages the author is communicating.
  • Synthesize and develop their theories and opinions through discussion to understand the world.
  • Plan the content and organization of each section and the entire piece to help readers develop an understanding of the topic.
  • Develop some parts of their writing more fully than others in order to communicate the information.
  • Readers and writers use context to clarify meanings of unfamiliar words.
  • Readers and writers use knowledge of roots and affixes to determine the meaning of new words.

Mathematics

Fractions Part 1 (7 weeks)

Compare and order fractions and mixed numbers, with and without models.
Represent equivalent fractions.

Multiplication and Division Part 1 (6 weeks)

  • Demonstrate fluency with multiplication facts through 12 x 12, and the corresponding division facts.
  • Estimate and determine products of whole numbers (1 digit × 1 digit and 1 digit × 2 digits).
  • Estimate and determine quotients of whole numbers, with and without remainders (1-digit divisor and 2-digit dividend).
  • Create and solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving multiplication and single-step practical problems involving division with whole numbers.
  • Identify, describe, create, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables (numerical).
  • Recognize and demonstrate the meaning of equality in an equation.

**Students will learn about Geometry during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**

Advanced Math

Fraction and Decimal Number Sense (2 weeks)

  • Compare and order fractions and mixed numbers, with and without models.
  • Represent equivalent fractions.
  • Identify the division statement that represents a fraction, with models and in context.
  • Given a decimal through thousandths, round to the nearest whole number, tenth, or hundredth.
  • Represent and identify equivalencies among fractions and decimals, with and without models.
  • Compare and order fractions, mixed numbers, and/or decimals, in a given set, from least to greatest and greatest to least.

Whole Number Computation (8 weeks)

  • Demonstrate fluency with multiplication facts through 12 x 12, and the corresponding division facts.
  • Estimate and determine products of whole numbers (1 digit × 1 digit and 1 digit × 2 digits).
  • Estimate and determine quotients of whole numbers, with and without remainders (1-digit divisor and 2-digit dividend).
  • Determine common multiples and factors, including least common multiple and greatest common factor.
  • Create and solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers.
  • Simplify whole number numerical expressions, using the order of operations.

**Students will learn about Algebraic Reasoning during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**

Science

Virginia Ecosystems/Weather & Beyond (3 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Asking questions and defining problems
    • Planning and carrying out investigations
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanations
    • Developing and using models
  • Investigate and understand that:
    • The survival of plants and animals depends on photosynthesis
    • Plants and animals have different structures and processes for obtaining energy and creating offspring

Virginia Ecosystems/Weather & Beyond (6 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating data
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanations 
  • Investigate and understand that:
    • Weather measurements create a record that can be used to make weather predictions
    • Common and extreme weather events affect ecosystems

Social Studies

Jamestown (3 weeks)

  • Evaluate the reasons for English colonization by exploring the perspectives and experiences of multiple culture groups.
  • Evaluate the reasons the Jamestown site was chosen and the challenges and changes that took place to ensure survival as a result.
  • Identify the roles of culture and power in the changing relationship between the Powhatan and English settlers.
  • Evaluate the importance of the events of 1619: arrival of Africans, arrival of English women (1620), and the first meeting of the General Assembly (analyze the voices that were present and not present in the General Assembly, and examine changes over time to the daily lives of Africans, English, and Native peoples in Jamestown).

Colonial Virginia (3 weeks)

  • Use a critical lens to understand the role of slavery on the growth of the colonial economy.
  • Describe how the daily life and culture of the Native peoples, Europeans, and Africans varied and reflected diversity and resilience.
  • Describe how money, barter, and credit were used in colonial Virginia.

American Revolution (3 weeks)

  • Explore the reasons why the colonies went to war with Great Britain and how their path to revolution connects to our modern world.
  • Examine the various roles of Revolutionary War leaders, American Indians, enslaved African Americans, whites, and free African Americans using a critical lens to evaluate various perspectives.
  • Evaluate the importance of the American victory at Yorktown.

Quarter 3 (January 25 – March 26)

Language Arts

Functional Texts (2 weeks)

  • Incorporate all parts of functional texts to understand the author’s purpose and to locate and interpret information.
  • Analyze text for implicit biases and become aware of personal biases.
  • Apply conventions (punctuation, sentence structure) as they edit their writing to strengthen the message.

Poetry (6 weeks)

  • Respond to poetry through performance, art, and writing in order to express their thoughts about a poem.
  • Through multiple readings, uncover the deeper meanings and discuss how the poet chose to reveal them.
  • Analyze the choices the poet makes to construct power, position, and perspectives.
  • Recognize how the use of the tools of poetry (alliteration, rhythm, metaphor, etc.) affect the meaning of poems.
  • Use knowledge of homophones, synonyms, and antonyms to determine the spelling and  meaning of new words.

Research and Writing about Research (6 weeks)

  • Engage in a process of inquiry to ask and seek answers to compelling questions.
  • Synthesize information across multiple texts and experiences in order to construct emerging understandings.
  • Collaborate to seek new ideas or clarify unresolved questions.
  • Analyze the choices the writer makes to construct power, position, and perspectives.
  • Use knowledge of roots and affixes to determine the spelling and meaning of new words.

Mathematics

Decimals (6 weeks)

  • Read, write, represent, and identify decimals expressed through thousandths.
  • Round decimals to the nearest whole number.
  • Compare and order decimals.
  • Given a model, write the decimal and fraction equivalents.
  • Add and subtract with decimals.
  • Solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving addition and subtraction with decimals.
  • Recognize and demonstrate the meaning of equality in an equation.

**Students will learn about Measurement during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**

Multiplication and Division Part 2 (5 weeks)

  • Demonstrate fluency with multiplication facts through 12 x 12, and the corresponding division facts.
  • Estimate and determine products of whole numbers (1 digit × 1 digit and 1 digit × 2 digits).
  • Estimate and determine quotients of whole numbers, with and without remainders (1-digit divisor and 2-digit dividend).
  • Create and solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving multiplication and single-step practical problems involving division with whole numbers.
  • Identify, describe, create, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables (numerical).
  • Recognize and demonstrate the meaning of equality in an equation.

Advanced Math

Decimal Computation (9 weeks)

  • Estimate and determine the product and quotient of two numbers involving decimals.
  • Create and solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving addition, subtraction, and multiplication of decimals, and create and solve single-step practical problems involving division of decimals.

Science

Magnetism & Electricity (9 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Planning and carrying out investigations
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanations
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
    • Asking questions and defining problems
    • Developing and using models
  • Investigate and understand:
    • The characteristics of electricity
    • Basic electrical circuits
    • Static electricity
    • The ability of electrical energy to be transformed into light and motion, and to produce heat
    • Simple electromagnets and magnetism

Social Studies

New Nation (3 weeks)

  • Explore the connections between liberty and slavery in the ideas and lives of George Washington, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and George Mason.
  • Explore the influence of geography and technological advances on the migration of Virginians into other states and western territories and how it impacted different cultures.

Civil War (6 weeks)

  • Use a critical lens to analyze the major events leading to the Civil War and interpret the legacy of it on Virginia today.
  • Understand the impact of Virginia's role during the Civil War.
  • Evaluate and interpret the roles of American Indians, whites, enslaved Africans, and free Africans prior to and during the Civil War. The student will identify acts of resistance and moral courage that resulted in the emancipation of African Americans.

Quarter 4 (April 5 – June 11)

Language Arts

Research & Writing About Research (6 weeks)

  • Engage in a process of inquiry to ask and seek answers to compelling questions.
  • Synthesize information across multiple texts and experiences in order to construct emerging understandings.
  • Collaborate to seek new ideas or clarify unresolved questions.
  • Analyze the choices the writer makes to construct power, position, and perspectives.
  • Engage in a process of inquiry to ask and seek answers to compelling questions.
  • Synthesize information across multiple texts and experiences in order to construct emerging understandings.
  • Collaborate to seek new ideas or clarify unresolved questions.
  • Use knowledge of roots and affixes to determine the spelling and meaning of new words.

Independent Writing Project and Choice of Reading Unit (5 weeks)

  • Reading goals and standards depend on the unit of choice.*
  • Use self-selected mentor texts to support revision and editing.
  • Decide what is needed to develop as writers and take steps to accomplish short and long-term goals.
  • Seek out support from and contribute support to fellow writers.
  • Word Study goals and standards depend on the unit of choice.*

*Please contact your child’s teacher to know which unit is being taught.

Mathematics

Multiplication and Division Part 2 (5 weeks)

  • Estimate and determine sums, differences, and products of whole numbers.
  • Estimate and determine quotients of whole numbers, with and without remainders.
  • Create and solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving addition, subtraction, and multiplication, and single-step practical problems involving division with whole numbers.
  • Identify, describe, create, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables.
  • Recognize and demonstrate the meaning of equality in an equation.

Fractions Part 2 (6 weeks)

  • Add and subtract fractions and mixed numbers having like and unlike denominators.
  • Solve single-step practical problems involving addition and subtraction with fractions and mixed numbers.
  • Identify, describe, create, and extend patterns found in objects, pictures, numbers, and tables.
  • Recognize and demonstrate the meaning of equality in an equation.

**Students will learn about Data, Statistics, and Probability during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**

Ensuring Mastery of Essential Standards (2 weeks)

For the final two weeks of school, students will have differentiated opportunities to continue to show mastery of year-long essential standards.

Advanced Math

Fraction Computation (8 weeks)

  • Solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving addition and subtraction with fractions and mixed numbers.
  • Solve single-step practical problems involving multiplication of a whole number, limited to 12 or less, and a proper fraction, with models.

**Students will learn about Data and Probability during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**

Ensuring Mastery of Essential Standards (2 weeks)

For the final two weeks of school, students will have differentiated opportunities to continue to show mastery of year-long essential standards, with a focus on Multiplication and Division of Decimals.
 

Science

Sciences in the Garden/Solar System (10 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Developing and using models
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanations
    • Asking questions and defining problems
    • Planning and carrying out investigations
    • Interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating data
  • Investigate and understand that:
    • The planets in the solar system
    • The order of the planets in the solar system
    • The relative sizes of the planets
    • The motions of Earth, the moon, and the sun
    • The causes for the phases of the moon
    • Changes in motion are related to force and mass
    • The causes for Earth’s seasons and the phases of the moon
    • Motion is described by an object's direction and speed
    • Changes in motion are related to force and mass
    • Friction is a force that opposes motion 

Social Studies

Reconstruction (3 weeks)

  • Explore the impact of Reconstruction on life in Virginia, focusing on the expanded rights of African Americans and the impact on Virginia's government.
  • Construct an understanding of the effects of segregation and "Jim Crow" on life in Virginia for American Indians, whites, and African Americans, analyzing the enduring legacy of racial discrimination on life in Virginia today.
  • Examine Virginia's economic development and the importance of railroads, new industries, and the growth of cities.

20th Century Virginia (3 weeks)

  • Analyze and evaluate how women's suffrage and the Great Depression affected Virginia and its citizens.
  • Analyze the social and political events in Virginia linked to Massive Resistance and desegregation.
  • Evaluate the political, social, or economic impact made by Maggie L. Walker, Harry F. Byrd, Sr., Oliver W. Hill, Sr., Arthur R. Ashe, Jr., A. Linwood Holton, and L. Douglas Wilder.

Virginia Today (4 weeks)

  • Construct an understanding of the three branches of Virginia government and the function of each.
  • Describe the major products and industries important to Virginia's economy.