Grade 1 Essential Standards

School Year 2020-21

For the FCPS Return to School in 2020-21, the standards listed below emphasize the central priorities for learning in each course. These standards are intended to guide instruction and assessment during this extraordinary school year.

Quarter 1 (September 8 – October 30)

Language Arts

Becoming a Community of Readers and Writers (5 weeks)

  • Learn to independently follow the predictable structures and routines of reading and writing workshop.
  • Explore a variety of genres and forms to determine what types of books to read and to support the purpose of what to write.
  • Eplain ideas and work to understand another’s idea about the text.
  • Talk with others throughout the writing process in order to develop ideas (e.g. rehearse, clarify, share).
  • Think about what is happening in the story to read it fluently.
  • Attempts at reading an unknown word starts with the correct first letter and matches the picture.

Learning About Print within Fiction (7 weeks)

  • Follow characters; develop ideas about how and why their feelings change.
  • Build on another’s idea through a discussion.
  • Explore whose perspective is told and whose is absent in text and illustrations.
  • Draw from familiar characters or personal situations to create stories.
  • Use elaboration techniques to develop important parts of the piece.
  • Use what students know about narrative writing to stretch out the conflict and resolution.
  • Attempts at reading an unknown word starts with the correct first letters and matches the picture.
  • Use known words and word parts to read new words.
  • Use punctuation in dialogue to reflect meaning through phrasing.

Mathematics

Counting and Numbers Part 1 (6 weeks)

  • Count forward orally by ones to 30, starting at any number between 0 and 30.
  • Write the numerals 0 to 30 in sequence and out-of-sequence.
  • Count backward orally by ones from 30.
  • Count forward orally by ones, fives, and tens to determine the total number of objects to 30.
  • Given up to 30 objects, group a collection into tens and ones and write the corresponding numeral.
  • Given up to 30 objects, compare two numbers between 0 and 30 represented pictorially or with concrete objects, using the words greater than, less than, or equal to,
  • Given up to 30 objects, order three or fewer sets from least to greatest and greatest to least.
  • Given a familiar problem situation involving magnitude, select a reasonable order of magnitude from two given quantities: a one-digit numeral and a two-digit numeral.
  • Identify, describe, extend, create, and transfer growing and repeating patterns.
    **Students will learn about Geometry during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**

Addition and Subtraction Part 1 (6 weeks)

  • Create and solve single-step story and picture problems using addition and subtraction within 10.
  • Recognize and describe with fluency part-whole relationships for numbers up to 10.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of equality through the use of the equal sign.

Science

Soaring Into Science: Part 1 (8 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Planning and carrying out investigations
    • Interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating data
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
    • Developing and using models
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanations
  • Investigate and understand:
    • Basic parts of plants
    • Plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics
    • Basic needs of animals include adequate air, food, water, shelter, and space (habitat)
    • Animals, including humans, have many different physical characteristics
    • Changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans
    • There are relationships between daily and seasonal changes
    • Changes in temperature, light, and precipitation can be observed and recorded over time

Social Studies

Being an American: Good Citizens (2 weeks)

Apply the traits of a good citizen, on and offline, by:

  • Focusing on fair play, exhibiting good sportsmanship, helping others, and treating others with respect
  • Recognizing the purpose of rules and practicing self-control
  • Working hard in school
  • Taking responsibility for one’s own actions
  • Valuing honesty and truthfulness in themselves and others

Being a Virginian (6 weeks)

  • Recognize symbols (American Flag) and traditional practices (Pledge of Allegiance) of the United States to understand patriotism.
  • Identify shapes of the United States and Virginia.
  • Locate Washington, D.C. and Richmond.
  • Identify the Virginia flag, state capitol building, state bird, and state flower.
  • Understand that people of Virginia have diverse ethnic origins, customs, and traditions and are united as Americans by common principles.
  • Describe life in Virginia's past and present, making connections to food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and recreation.

Quarter 2 (November 2 – January 22)

Language Arts

Learning About Print within Fiction (7 weeks)

  • Follow characters; develop ideas about how and why their feelings change.
  • Build on another’s idea through a discussion.
  • Explore whose perspective is told and whose is absent in text and illustrations.
  • Draw from familiar characters or personal situations to create stories.
  • Use elaboration techniques to develop important parts of the piece.
  • Use what students know about narrative writing to stretch out the conflict and resolution.
  • Attempts at reading an unknown word starts with the correct first letters and matches the picture.  
  • Use known words and word parts to read new words.
  • Use punctuation in dialogue to reflect meaning through phrasing.

Learning About Print within Nonfiction (7 weeks)

  • Use photographs, illustrations, and text to build their understanding and teach others about a topic.
  • Develop ideas about a topic and are aware that their ideas can change as they read more.
  • Decide whether-or-not to accept the messages of the text.
  • Use an organizational pattern that allows them to elaborate on a focused topic in pictures and words.
  • Use photographs, illustrations, and text to build their understanding and teach others about a topic.
  • Use multiple sources of information in order to solve, monitor, self-correct, and confirm.
  • Use known words and word parts to solve new words.
  • Notice a range of punctuation and dialogue to reflect meaning through phrasing.

Mathematics

Addition and Subtraction Part 1 (6 weeks)

  • Create and solve single-step story and picture problems using addition and subtraction within 10.
  • Recognize and describe with fluency part-whole relationships for numbers up to 10.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of equality through the use of the equal sign.

Counting and Number Part 2 (6 weeks)

  • Count forward orally by ones to 110, starting at any number between 0 and 110.
  •  Write the numerals 0 to 110 in sequence and out-of-sequence.
  • Count backward orally by ones when given any number between 1 and 30.
  • Count forward orally by ones, twos, fives, and tens to determine the total number of objects to 110.
  • Group a collection of up to 110 objects into tens and ones and write the corresponding numeral to develop an understanding of place value.
  • Given up to 110 objects, compare two numbers between 0 and 110 represented pictorially or with concrete objects, using the words greater than, less than or equal to.

**Students will learn about Money during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**
 

Science

Soaring Into Science: Part I (12 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Asking questions and defining problems
    • Planning and carrying out investigations
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanations.
    • Interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating data
  • Investigate and understand that: 
    • Changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans
    • There are relationships between daily and seasonal changes
    • Objects may have straight, circular, and back-and-forth motions
    • Pushes or pulls can change the movement of an object
    • Objects may vibrate and produce sound
    • Some liquids will separate when mixed with water, but others will not
    • Some solids will dissolve in water, but others will not
    • Some substances will dissolve more readily in hot water than in cold water

Social Studies

Being an American: Leadership (4 weeks)

Apply the traits of a good citizen, on and offline, by:

  • Valuing honesty and truthfulness in themselves and others
  • Participating in classroom decision making
  • Understand that people of Virginia have state and local government officials who are elected by voters.
  • Understand people make contributions to their communities.

Economics and Geography (3 weeks)

  • Classify goods and services and how people are consumers and producers.
  • Recognize map symbols (land, water, roads, cities, etc.).
  • Use cardinal directions on maps (north, south, east, west).
  • Construct simple maps that include a title, map legend, and compass rose.

The First Virginians: Jamestown (3 weeks)

  • Explain the significance of the Jamestown settlement.
  • Understand the perspectives of influential people and their effects on Virginia history:
    • Powhatan
    • Pocahontas
    • Christopher Newport

Quarter 3 (January 25 – March 26)

Language Arts

Learning About Print within Poetry (7 weeks)

  • Respond to a variety of poems through movement, performance, or participation in order to discover their personal interests and tastes in poetry.
  • Through multiple readings, readers explain their personal interpretation.
  • Determine whether they agree with the ideas in the text.
  • Poets use tools (rhythm, repetition, line-breaks) to express feelings and experiences.
  • Use multiple sources of information in order to solve, monitor, self-correct, and confirm.
  • Use known words and word parts to read new words.

Learning About Print through Research and Writing (6 weeks)

  • Ask questions about a line of interest.
  • Use close observation to learn new information.
  • Collaborate and discuss observations and questions.
  • Decide what message to send.
  • Take words apart while reading for meaning.
  • Demonstrate appropriate rate, phrasing, intonation, and pausing while reading.

Mathematics

Addition and Subtraction Part 2 (6 weeks)

  • Create and solve single-step story and picture problems using addition and subtraction within 10.
  • Recognize and describe with fluency part whole relationships for numbers up to 10.
  • Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction within 10.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of equality through the use of the equal symbol.

**Students will learn about Data Analysis during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**

Fractions (3 weeks)

  • Represent and solve practical problems involving equal sharing with two or four sharers.
  • Represent and name fractions for halves and fourths, using models.

Science

Soaring Into Science: Part II (9 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Asking questions and defining problems
    • Interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating data
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanations
    • Developing and using models
    • Planning and carrying out investigations
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
  • Investigate and understand that:
    • Animals need adequate air, food, water, shelter, and space (habitat)
    • Animals, including humans, have many different physical characteristics
    • Plants and animals can be classified according to a variety of characteristics
    • Plants need nutrients, air, water, light, and a place to grow
    • Plants have parts with specific functions
    • Changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans
    • There are relationships between daily and seasonal changes

Social Studies

Being an American: Courage (3 weeks)

  • Apply the traits of a good citizen, on and offline, by:
  • Focusing on fair play, good sportsmanship, helping others, treating others with respect
  • Recognizing the purpose of rules and practicing self-control
  • Describe and make connections to the work of Martin Luther King Jr.

Building a Nation (3 weeks)

  • Describe and make connections to the impacts of influential Virginians who helped form a new nation, with a focus on, but not limited to George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.
  • Make connections to people and events associated with George Washington Day (Presidents' Day) and Independence Day.

Economics / Geography (3 weeks)

  • Understand the relationship between money and savings.
  • Understand that geographical features, such as landforms and location, affect how people live.

Quarter 4 (April 5 – June 11)

Language Arts

Learning About Print through Research and Writing (6 weeks)

  • Ask questions about a line of interest.
  • Use close observation to learn new information.
  • Collaborate and discuss their observations and questions.
  • Decide what message to send in the information piece.
  • Take words apart to support reading multisyllabic words for meaning.
  • Demonstrate appropriate rate, phrasing, intonation, and pausing to inform how reading sounds.

Independent Reading/Writing Project/Choice Unit (6 weeks)

  • Reading goals and standards depend on the unit of choice.*
  • Writing goals and standards depend on the unit of choice.*
  • Monitor and self-correct while reading.
  • Take words apart efficiently and flexibly to support spelling and reading.
  • Integrate appropriate rate, phrasing, intonation, pausing, and stress when reading orally.
  • Please contact your child’s teacher to know which unit is being taught.

Mathematics

Addition and Subtraction Part 3 (8 weeks)

  • Create and solve single-step story and picture problems using addition and subtraction within 10.
  • Recognize and describe with fluency part whole relationships for numbers up to 10.
  • Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction within 10.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of equality through the use of the equal symbol.

**Students will learn about Measurement during asynchronous instruction with provided digital resources**

Ensuring Mastery of Essential Standards (2 weeks)

  • For the final two weeks of school, students will have differentiated opportunities to continue to show mastery of year-long essential standards.

Science

Soaring into Science Part II (9 weeks)

  • Demonstrate an understanding of scientific and engineering practices by:
    • Asking questions and defining problems
    • Planning and carrying out investigations
    • Interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating data
    • Constructing and critiquing conclusions and explanation
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
  • Investigate and understand that:
    • The sun is the source of energy and light that warms the land, air, and water
    • The sun’s relative position in the morning is east and in the late afternoon is west
    • Identification of natural resources
    • There are factors that affect air and water quality
    • Recycling, reusing, and reducing consumption of natural resources helps to conserve them
    • Changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans
    • There are relationships between daily and seasonal changes

Social Studies

Civics: Making Contributions (3 weeks)

  • Apply the traits of a good citizen, on and offline, by working hard in school.
  • Understand that the people of Virginia make contributions to their communities.

Influential Virginians / Economics (3 weeks)

  • Describe the stories of influential people including Maggie L. Walker and Arthur R. Ashe, Jr. and their contributions to Virginia.
  • Explain that people make choices because they cannot have everything they want.
  • Understand that people save money for the future to purchase goods and services.

Geography and Map Skills (4 weeks)

  • Recognize map symbols including land, water, cities, roads, etc.
  • Use cardinal directions on maps.
  • Construct simple maps that include a title, map legend, and compass rose.