2021 General Assembly Session

Conduct & Discipline Related Legislation

2021 General Assembly Summary – Post Session Report
Conduct & Discipline Related Legislation
Fairfax County Public Schools, Office of Government Relations

This report describes the Conduct & Discipline related legislation considered during the 2021 General Assembly Regular Session.  Bills are listed as having Passed or Failed. 

The Governor has until March 31 to act on any legislation adopted by the General Assembly and he has the option to sign, amend, or veto any bill.  Bills with amendments or vetoes will be considered by the General Assembly at its Reconvened Session, scheduled for April 7.  Legislation signed by the Governor goes into effect on July 1, 2021 unless otherwise specified in the legislation itself.

Summaries are linked to the Division of Legislative Services’ web pages for text, up to date summary information, and fiscal impact statements. If a bill of interest is not found in one category, please check another as legislation often can fit under multiple categories.

 

UPDATED:  March 10, 2021

PASSED

Drug Control Act; Schedule I SB 1464 (Newman) would add certain chemicals to Schedule I of the Drug Control Act. The Board of Pharmacy has added these substances to Schedule I in an expedited regulatory process. A substance added via this process is removed from the schedule after 18 months unless a general law is enacted adding the substance to the schedule.

Youth Justice Diversion Programs HB 2017 (Mullin) would authorize any jurisdiction to establish a youth justice diversion program, defined in the bill as a diversionary program that (i) is monitored by a local youth justice diversion program advisory committee; (ii) uses juvenile volunteers as lawyers, jurors, and other court personnel; (iii) uses volunteer attorneys as judges; (iv) conducts peer trials, subject to the juvenile and domestic relations court's jurisdiction, of juveniles who are referred to the program by an intake officer; and (v) imposes various sentences emphasizing restitution, rehabilitation, accountability, competency building, and education, but not incarceration. The bill would provide that a jurisdiction may establish a youth justice diversion program upon establishment of a local youth justice diversion program advisory committee and approval of the program by the chief judge of the juvenile and domestic relations court that serves such jurisdiction The bill would require each local youth justice diversion program advisory committee to establish criteria for the eligibility and participation of juveniles alleged to have committed a delinquent act other than an act that would be a felony or a Class 1 misdemeanor if committed by an adult, with the consent of the juvenile's parent or legal guardian, and to establish policies and procedures for the operation of such program. The bill would provide that whenever an intake officer takes informal action on a complaint alleging that a child committed a delinquent act other than an act that would be a felony or a Class 1 misdemeanor if committed by an adult, the intake officer may refer the juvenile to a youth justice diversion program. The bill also would add provisions that the Department of Juvenile Justice shall develop a statewide evaluation model and conduct ongoing evaluations of the effectiveness and efficiency of youth justice diversion programs and report these evaluations to the General Assembly by December 1 of each year.