FCPS Postsecondary Profile

2017-2018

Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) inspires and empowers students to meet high academic standards; lead healthy, ethical lives; and be responsible and innovative global citizens.

Curriculum

The instructional program for FCPS is defined by the Program of Studies. This comprehensive, rigorous curriculum contains benchmarks outlined in the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL). Additionally, in 2014 FCPS adopted the Portrait of a Graduate to answer this question: What are the skills necessary for success for all children in this rapidly changing, increasingly diverse, and interconnected world? Portrait of a Graduate moves FCPS students and staff members to look beyond the high-stakes testing environment and to help our students develop skills so they can be successful in the workforce of the future.

Six high school academies offer technical and specialized courses not found at all high schools. Career and Technical Education (CTE), fine arts, and world languages courses are accessed by students from all high schools. CTE courses offer numerous credentialing opportunities for students who pass industry certification exams.

Advanced academic courses are offered in all high schools and are open to all students who seek academic rigor. Students may enroll in honors courses as underclassmen and continue in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or dual enrollment courses. IB Diploma Program (DP) candidates can be identified in their secondary school reports or letters of recommendation. FCPS is also home to Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, a public magnet school and a Governor’s School offering a comprehensive curriculum, emphasizing science, mathematics, and technology.

Graduates

Ninety-two percent of the approximately 13,114 FCPS 2017 high school graduates indicated their intention to attend postsecondary educational institutions. Of this group:

  • 64.2 percent pursue enrollment at four-year colleges
  • 25.0 percent pursue enrollment at two-year colleges
  • 6.3 percent pursue military/employment
  • 3.1 percent pursue other educational plans

Grade Point Average and Class Rank

Grade point average (GPA) is calculated on the basis of all high school courses for which credit has been earned, attempted, and previously awarded. FCPS high schools do not rank students. High school courses taken in middle school may be expunged from the high school transcript. The parent must submit a request within nine weeks of his and/or her child entering an FCPS high school.

Grading System

Letter Grade Percent Grade Grade Points
A 93-100 4.0
A- 90-92 3.7
B+ 87-89 3.3
B 83-86 3.0
B- 80-82 2.7
C+ 77-79 2.3
C 73-76 2.0
C- 70-72 1.7
D+ 67-69 1.3
D 64-66 1.0
F 0-63 0.0

P = Pass
WP = Withdrawal Pass
WF = Withdrawal Fail
NM = No Mark (No Credit)
T = Audit (No Credit)

Additional Weighting for Advanced Academic Courses

Students who take a year-long high school honors course in English, mathematics, science, or social studies or who take a level 4 or level 5 world language course are granted 0.5 added to their GPA calculation for each course taken.

Students who take a year-long AP, IB, or dual-enrollment course are granted 1.0 added to their GPA calculation for each AP, IB, or dual-enrollment course taken.

National Achievements

  • In the class of 2018, FCPS has 223 National Merit Semifinalists, which constitutes 59.8 percent of Virginia’s semifinalists.
  • In the 2017 The Washington Post rankings, all traditional FCPS high schools were in the top 12 percent of all American high schools as measured by their student participation in Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate exams.
  • The number of Advanced Placement exams taken by FCPS students has risen from 33,983 in 2011 to 37,298 in 2016. Additionally, more than 73 percent of Advanced Placement exams taken by FCPS students in 2016 received a score of 3 or above (on a grading scale of 1-5).
  • In 2016-17, 67.6 percent of graduates earned advanced studies diplomas.

SAT Scores

The mean 2017 SAT scores for FCPS seniors as compared to state and national public school mean scores.

SAT statistics are calculated upon the last test for which a student was assessed.

  Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Mathematics
FCPS 595 592
Virginia 558 538
Nation 527 517

ACT Scores

The mean 2017 ACT scores for FCPS seniors as compared to state and national public school mean scores.

  English Mathematics Reading Science
FCPS 26.2 26.3 27.1 26
Virginia 23.3 23.2 24.4 23.4
Nation 20.3 20.7 21.4 21

Community and Demographics

FCPS is the tenth largest school system in the nation with approximately 189,870 students attending 198 schools and centers. FCPS students come from countries from around the world and speak more than 200 different languages. Nearly half of the students enrolled in an FCPS elementary school speak a language other than English at home. During the 2016-17 school year, approximately 40 percent of FCPS students identify themselves as White; 20 percent Asian; 25 percent Hispanic; 10 percent African American; and 5 percent as Other.

Around 27,572 FCPS students, or 14.6 percent of all students, are projected to receive services for English learners (EL). Nearly 26,000 students, or 14 percent, are projected to receive special education services. 50,872 FCPS students, more than one student out of every four, are eligible for the Federal Free and Reduced-Price Meals Program (FRM).

Located in Fairfax County, Virginia, FCPS is the most populous jurisdiction in Virginia and the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area, with more than one million residents. Approximately 65 percent of all county residents over 25 years of age have completed four years of college.

FCPS has 29 high schools with a total high school enrollment of 58,332. The average number of course units taken by each graduate is 29.2.

Teacher staffing is determined based on a class size of 31.0. The 2016-17 average per-pupil cost for high school students is $14,767.

Disclosure of Student Disciplinary Infractions

It is the student’s responsibility to disclose discipline infractions to postsecondary institutions.