True Katydid

Pterophylla camellifolia

Lang Elliot, naturesound.com

True Katydids are relatives of grasshoppers and crickets. They grow over two inches long and are leaf-green in color.

Katydids have oval-shaped wings with lots of veins. They resemble leaves.

True Katydids live in forests, thickets, or fields with lots of shrubs or trees. Katydids spend most of their time at the tops of trees where most of the leaves are.

Usually katydids are heard, but not seen.

Herbert A. "Joe" Pase III, Texas Forest Service

T.J. Walker, University of Florida

Unlike grasshoppers and crickets, both male and female katydids make sounds. They rub their forewings (front wings) together to "sing" to each other. Katydid hear each other with ears on their front legs.

Breeding season is in late Summer and early Fall. Females will lay eggs on stems.

Eggs will hatch the following Spring into nymphs. Nymphs are young katydids not fully grown. Katydid nymphs eat and grow, molting their skin several times. Each time the nymph sheds its skin it looks more like an adult. Finally, after its last molt, the nymph has changed into an adult katydid.

True Katydids eat leaves of most deciduous (lose leaves in Fall) trees and shrubs, especially oaks.

Katydids can fly short distances when threatened, but they prefer to walk and climb. When they do fly, it is more of a downward flutter. If a katydid lands on the ground, it will walk to the nearest tree and climb.

Predators of True Katydids include birds, bats, spiders, frogs, snakes, and other insect-eaters.

Additional Media

Description
Type
Credit
True Katydid Sound #1
Sound
Unknown
True Katydid Sound #2
Sound
Unknown
True Katydid Sound #3
Sound
Unknown
Katydid's Head Under a Microscope
Link to Image
Uglybug.org

Relationships in Nature:

FOOD
PREDATORS
SHELTER
OTHER

White Oak

Great Crested Flycatcher

White Oak

Black Oak

Northern Cardinal

Black Oak

Willow Oak

American Robin

Willow Oak

American Sycamore

Big Brown Bat

American Sycamore

Mockernut Hickory

American Toad

Mockernut Hickory

American Elm

Eastern Garter Snake

American Elm

American Beech

Rabid Wolf Spider

American Beech

Sassafras

Barred Owl

Sassafras

Red Maple

Red-tailed Hawk

Red Maple

Yellow Poplar

Chinese Mantid

Yellow Poplar

Sweetgum

Blue Jay

Sweetgum

Silver Maple

Common Crow

Silver Maple

Black Cherry

White-breasted Nuthatch

Black Cherry

Witch Hazel

Red-winged Blackbird

Witch Hazel

Eastern Bluebird

Poison Ivy

Bluegill

Trumpet Creeper

Bald-faced Hornet

Wild Grape

Six-spotted Tiger Beetle

Virginia Creeper

Six-spotted Fishing Spider

Greenbrier

Relationship to Humans:

Most people enjoy the sound of katydids on late Summer evenings. They are rarely in large enough numbers to be destructive to trees, and they are a good food source for other wildlife.

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Animal
PHYLUM
Arthropod
CLASS
Insect
ORDER
Orthoptera
FAMILY
Tettigoniidae
GENUS
Pterophylla
SPECIES
Pterophylla camellifolia

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