Rabid Wolf Spider

Rabidosa rabida

E.R. Degginger / Color-Pic, Inc.

The Rabid Wolf Spider is easily confused with other wolf spiders. It can be identified by its stripe pattern.

The cephalothorax (front body section) has two dark stripes. The abdomen (rear body section) has one dark stripe surrounded by two pale lines.

The female, which is larger than the male, can have a body length (not counting legs) of almost an inch. The male's body is usually about half an inch.

Wolf spiders do not build webs to catch prey. They do weave silk to build a shelter, or to build a sac to carry eggs in.

Rabid Wolf Spiders hunt their food at night, ambushing prey or using their speed. This brownish-yellow spider camouflages well with dead leaves and bark.

They eat mostly insects.

When Rabid Wolf Spiders breed, the male does a sort of "dance", by waving its pedipalps (large leg-like mouthparts). He also makes a noise.

When the female lays eggs, she builds a silk eggsac to carry them in. She attaches the sac to her abdomen. When spiderlings (baby spiders) hatch, they ride on her back until they are old enough to be on their own.

Rabid Wolf Spiders can be seen in woods, meadows, or anywhere there are leaves.

If captured, they will bite, but they are not considered dangerous.

If you see them at night with a flashlight, their eyes will reflect light.

Additional Media

Description
Type
Credit
Male Rabid Wolf Spider
Sound
The Spider Lab
Male Rabid Wolf Spider Courtship Dance
Video
The Spider Lab
Spider Anatomy Diagram
Link to Printable Page

EnchantedLearning.com

Wolf Spider's Head Under a Microscope
Link to Image
Uglybug.org
Download Quicktime if you are unable to play video.

Relationships in Nature:

PREY
PREDATORS
SHELTER
OTHER

Isopod

Red-backed Salamander

Virginia Creeper

Black Carpenter Ant

Organ-pipe Mud Dauber

Poison Ivy

Pennsylvania Firefly

Red-winged Blackbird

Bracken Fern

Eastern Bloodsucking Conenose

Wood Frog

Red Clover

Horned Fungus Beetle

Least Shrew

Common Elderberry

Field Cricket

Five-lined Skink

Japanese Honeysuckle

Chinese Mantid

Wild Turkey

Running Cedar

Northern Ringneck Snake

American Toad

Bushy Aster

Fungus Gnat

Red-tailed Hawk

Wild Strawberry

Giant Willow Aphid

Daring Jumping Spider

Common Greenshield

Differential Grasshopper

Garden Centipede

British Soldiers

True Katydid

Brown-headed Cowbird

Virginia Rose

Sassafras Weevil

Northern Ringneck Snake

Dogwood Borer

Great Crested Flycatcher

Buffalo Treehopper

Spring Peeper

Organ-pipe Mud Dauber

Striped Skunk

Carolina Chickadee

Spotted Salamander

Southern Leopard Frog

Six-spotted Tiger Beetle

Relationship to Humans:

Rabid Wolf Spiders benefit humans greatly by controlling pesky insects. Like all spiders, they eat an enormous amount of insects every day, and Rabid Wolf Spiders are very large spiders.

They sometimes enter homes, but they should not be harmed. They most likely have followed "food" into your house.

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Animal
PHYLUM
Arthropod
CLASS
Arachnid
ORDER
Araneae
FAMILY
Lycosidae
GENUS
Rabidosa
SPECIES
Rabidosa rabida

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