Green Stinkbug

Acrosternum hilare

Copyright, Marlin. E. Rice

Green Stinkbugs are bright green with yellow, orange, or red edges. They have black spots on their sides and grow up to 3/4 inch long. Stinkbugs are shield-shaped (think of a shield from Medieval times).

Green Stinkbugs live in fields, gardens, and the edges of woods.

They get their name because of the foul-smelling liquid they release when something disturbs them.

Copyright, Oklahoma State University

Copyright, Marlin. E. Rice

Green Stinkbugs mate in the Spring. Females lay barrel-shaped, green eggs together under a leaf in the pattern of a honeycomb. Eggs hatch in about a week.

Green Stinkbug nymphs are born from the eggs. Nymphs look a little different from adult stinkbugs. Nymphs are black at first, then they turn green with red, yellow, and black markings. Their bodies are oval-shaped.

These insects do not have a pupa (resting) stage. Instead, nymphs eat and grow, shedding their skin several times. Each time a nymph sheds its skin, it looks a little more like an adult.

It takes a Green Stinkbug nymph about a month to turn into an adult.

If the weather stays warm, an adult stinkbug lives about two months. If a young stinkbug is around when the weather gets cold, it will hibernate in leaf litter or a tree hole until Spring.

Green Stinkbugs eat a wide variety of plants. In fact, they eat just about anything. Some of their favorite food sources are Black Cherry, Flowering Dogwood, Evergreen Blackberry, and pine trees. Stinkbugs will suck juices from leaves, flowers, fruits, and stems. They have sharp mouthparts which they use to pierce the plant.

Adult Green Stinkbugs are strong fliers, but nymphs cannot fly.

Predators of stinkbugs include many species of birds, toads, spiders, and other insect-eating animals.

Additional Media

Description
Type
Credit
Green Stinkbug's Head Under a Microscope
Link to Image
Uglybug.org

Relationships in Nature:

FOOD
PREDATORS
SHELTER
OTHER

Black Cherry

American Robin

Black Cherry

Flowering Dogwood

Red-winged Blackbird

Flowering Dogwood

Evergreen Blackberry

Northern Mockingbird

Evergreen Blackberry

Eastern White Pine

Brown-headed Cowbird

Eastern White Pine

Virginia Pine

Northern Cardinal

Virginia Pine

Loblolly Pine

American Toad

Loblolly Pine

Goldenrod

Wood Frog

Goldenrod

Red Clover

Chinese Mantid

Red Clover

English Plantain

Green Darner

English Plantain

Pokeweed

Big Brown Bat

Pokeweed

Queen Anne's Lace

Black Carpenter Ant

Queen Anne's Lace

Highbush Blueberry

Garden Centipede

Highbush Blueberry

Witch Hazel

Wild Turkey

Witch Hazel

Spicebush

Northern Bobwhite

Spicebush

Greenbrier

Blue Jay

Greenbrier

Common Elderberry

Carolina Chickadee

Common Elderberry

Common Ragweed

White-breasted Nuthatch

Common Ragweed

Black-eyed Susan

Harvestman

Black-eyed Susan

Chicory

Ring-legged Earwig

Climbing Bittersweet

Six-spotted Fishing Spider

Relationship to Humans:

Green Stinkbugs can be great pests. Besides all the weeds, shrubs, and trees they eat; they also eat crops, including apples, cherries, peaches, eggplants, tomatoes, beans, peas, and corn. When there are many stinkbugs together, they can cause a lot of damage. Otherwise, they can be helping to control plant growth.

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Animal
PHYLUM
Arthropod
CLASS
Insect
ORDER
Hemiptera
FAMILY
Pentatomidae
GENUS
Acrosternum
SPECIES
Acrosternum hilare

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