Daring Jumping Spider

Phidippus audax

Jim Kalisch, UNL Entomology

The Daring Jumping Spider is one of the most common spiders in our area. It gets its name because of its amazing leaping ability.

Male Daring Jumping Spiders are between 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch long. Females are slightly larger.

This spider is black with a gray or white crossband on its abdomens (back body section) and several gray or white spots.

The Daring Jumping Spider lives in woods, fields, or gardens. It is often seen on tree trunks, fallen limbs, leaves, or other ground litter.

These spiders do not build webs to catch prey. Instead, they hunt their prey on foot. They do use silk to make a small shelter under a leaf or bark.

To catch prey, Daring Jumping Spiders sneak up on it, then pounce. They can leap great distances when you consider their size.

These spiders eat all sorts of insects, as well as other spiders. They do most of their hunting during the day.

Troy Bartlett, copyright 1998-2002

Daring Jumping Spiders have some of the best vision of all spiders. They have eight eyes. Four big eyes are located on the spider's face. The other four are on top of the head.

Female spiders use silk to put eggs in. They usually stay in their silky leaf shelter until the eggs have hatched and all the spiderlings have left.

Predators of Daring Jumping Spiders include birds, shrews, lizards, and other bug-eating creatures.

Jim Kalisch, UNL Entomology

Copyright, Paul D. Pratt

Additional Media

Description
Type
Credit
Spider Anatomy Diagram
Link to Printable Page
EnchantedLearning.com
Unidentified Jumping Spider's Head Under a Microscope
Link to Image
Uglybug.org

Relationships in Nature:

PREY
PREDATORS
SHELTER
OTHER

Common Black Ground Beetle

Wild Turkey

Poison Ivy

Pennsylvania Firefly

Red-winged Blackbird

Bracken Fern

Ring-legged Earwig

American Robin

Virginia Creeper

Horned Fungus Beetle

Five-lined Skink

Trumpet Creeper

Goldenrod Gall Fly

Red-backed Salamander

Wild Grape

Eastern Blood-sucking Conenose

Wood Frog

Greenbrier

Giant Willow Aphid

American Toad

Common Dandelion

Blue Bottle Fly

Spring Peeper

Common Ragweed

Field Cricket

Eastern Newt

Bird-foot Violet

Differential Grasshopper

Garden Centipede

Chicory

Goldenrod Spider

Great Crested Flycatcher

Kentucky Bluegrass

Rabid Wolf Spider

Eastern Bluebird

Fungus Gnat

Eastern Mole

Soil Mite

Harvestman

Sassafras Weevil

Northern Bobwhite

Buffalo Treehopper

Southern Leopard Frog

Chigger

Tufted Titmouse

Three-lined Salamander

Common Grackle

Six-spotted Tiger Beetle

Relationship to Humans:

Daring Jumping Spiders are great insect controllers. They do enter homes sometimes and can be found on window sills or curtains hunting insects. They will kill many household pests, such as fleas, flies, moths, and crickets. They do bite people when they are disturbed. The bite can sometimes leave a whelt.

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Animal
PHYLUM
Arthropod
CLASS
Arachnid
ORDER
Araneae
FAMILY
Salticidae
GENUS
Phidippus
SPECIES
Phidippus audax

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