Creek Chub

Semotilus atromaculatus

The Creek Chub is a common minnow throughout Virginia. Its back is olive-colored, it has silvery sides, and it has a long blackish-brown stripe down the side. The Creek Chub has rounded fins, and the dorsal (back) fin has eight rays (spikes). Creek Chubs can grow to 12 inches, but they are usually much smaller.

Creek Chubs live mostly in small to medium-sized streams, but they sometimes live in lakes too. They prefer clear to slightly cloudy water with a gravel bottom. Creek Chubs especially like to be near beaver dams.

Creek Chubs eat copepods (small crustaceans; cousins of shrimp) and water fleas when they are young. As adults, they eat aquatic insects, terrestrial insects (land insects that fall in the water), worms, and small fish.

They are preyed upon by larger fish, such as the Largemouth Bass, Kingfishers, Mergansers, and even larger Creek Chubs!

To breed, the male Creek Chub will build a nest. He will dig a pit on the bottom of the stream by moving pebbles with his mouth. He will then pile pebbles up to build a small ridge upstream of the pit. Once he is finished the male chub will defend his nest from other males. Next, a female will arrive and the fish will mate. The female chub will lay 25 to 50 eggs in the pit and leave. The male will then cover up the eggs with gravel and leave also.

Creek Chubs can live up to eight years.

www.nativefish.org

Konrad Schmidt

Additional Media

Description
Type
Credit
Creek Chub Swimming
Video
Mark Moran
Creek Chub Swimming #2
Video
Mark Moran
Download Quicktime if you are unable to play video.

Relationships in Nature:

PREY/FOOD
PREDATORS
SHELTER
OTHER

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Largemouth Bass

Common Duckweed

Beaver SP

Eastern Dobsonfly

Belted Kingfisher

Common Cattail

The Big Red Worm Pa

Scud

Great Blue Heron

Yellow Pond Lily

Water Flea

Common Snapping Turtle

Pickerelweed

Eastern Newt

Black Crappie

Common Reed

Large Diving Beetle

Yellow Perch

Tussock Sedge

Tesselated Darter

Barred Owl

Green Algae

Bluegill

Green Darner

Long-leaf Pondweed

Yellow Perch

Channel Catfish

Hydrilla

Golden Shiner

American Robin

Greater Bladderwort

Spring Peeper

Large Diving Beetle

Wild Rice

Euglena

Golden Shiner

Green Algae

Eastern Painted Turtle

Snow Flea

Striped Skunk

Spotted Salamander

Northern Water Snake

Ebony Jewelwing

Greater Bladderwort

CommonWater Strider

Yellow Bullhead

Common Whitetail

Northern Hog Sucker

Aquatic Worm

Double-crested Cormorant

Northern Caddis Fly

Bald Eagle

Relationship to Humans:

Creek Chubs are often used by humans as bait to catch larger fish. They are rarely eaten themselves, probably because they don't normally reach a worthwhile size. Creek Chubs also benefit us by consuming large numbers of insects, especially mosquitos.

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Animal
PHYLUM
Chordate
CLASS
Bony Fish
ORDER
Cypriniformes
FAMILY
Cyprinidae
GENUS
Semotilus
SPECIES
Semotilus atromaculatus

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