Common Ragweed

Ambrosia artemisiifolia

Kenneth J. Sytsma, Wisconsin State Herbarium

Stephen L. Solheim, Wisconsin State Herbarium

Common Ragweed grows up to five feet tall. It has hairy stems and light green leaves, up to four inches long.

Ragweed grows in fields, gardens, roadsides, and waste places. It is an annual, which means it only lives for one season.

Ragweed flowers are yellowish-green and small. They grow in clusters up to six inches long near the top of the plant.

Hugh Wilson

Kenneth J. Sytsma, Wisconsin State Herbarium

Dr. John Meade, Rutgers Cooperative Extension

Ragweed flowers make huge amounts of pollen. Pollen is transferred from one plant to another by wind and insects. Once a flower is pollinated, it forms fruit. The fruits of this plant are small and top-shaped, with small spines.

Common Ragweed blooms from July to October.

Ragweed is a good source of food and cover for wildlife. Eastern Cottontails eat the plants, and insects, such as grasshoppers, eat the leaves. Some animals which eat ragweed seeds include: Meadow Vole, Dark-eyed Junco, Brown-headed Cowbird, Northern Bobwhite, Purple Finch, Mourning Dove, American Goldfinch, and Red-bellied Woodpecker.

Ragweed often grows alongside, and in competition with, other weedy plants.

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Relationships in Nature:

Animals Using as Food Source

Animals Using as Shelter

Associations With Other Plants

OTHER

Eastern Cottontail

Differential Grasshopper

Queen Anne's Lace

Honey Bee Po

Honey Bee

Chinese Mantid

Common Milkweed

Golden Northern Bumble Bee Po

Meadow Vole

Green Stinkbug

Devil's Beggar-tick

American Goldfinch

Eastern Cottontail

Switchgrass

Mourning Dove

Meadow Vole

Goldenrod

Brown-headed Cowbird

Northern Bobwhite

Pokeweed

Differential Grasshopper

Dark-eyed Junco

Smooth Crabgrass

Northern Bobwhite

AmericanToad

Lamb's Quarters

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Eastern Garter Snake

English Plantain

Purple Finch

Field Cricket

Red Clover

Dark-eyed Junco

Daring Jumping Spider

Sassafras

Green Stinkbug

Garden Centipede

Common Dandelion

Field Cricket

Isopod

Bull Thistle

Leopard Slug

Eastern Chipmunk

Bird-foot Violet

Beaver

Woodchuck

Chicory

Golden Northern Bumble Bee

Eastern Mole

Common Mullein

Tufted Titmouse

Five-lined Skink

Common Grackle

Leopard Slug

Eastern Blood-sucking Conenose

Chigger

Relationship to Humans:

Many people suffer from allergies to ragweed pollen. Because Common Ragweed flowers produce such large amounts of pollen which is distributed by wind, it is easy for people to inhale the tiny pollen grains.

Ragweed does good, too! It provides food and shelter for wildlife.

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Plant
DIVISION
Magnoliophyta
CLASS
Magnoliopsida
ORDER
Asterales
FAMILY
Asteraceae
GENUS
Ambrosia
SPECIES
Ambrosia artemisiifolia

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