Carolina Wren

Thryothorus ludovicianus

Copyright, Dr. Dan Sudia

The Carolina Wren is our most common wren. It grows more than 5 inches long and is brown, with a light yellowish-beige belly. It has a large white stripe over each eye, and a whitish throat. Like most wrens, it often holds its tail up when perched.

Carolina Wrens live in thickets, forests, marshes, parks, streamsides, and gardens. They like brushy areas with lots of shrubs and vines. These birds live here year-round.

In the Spring, Carolina Wrens build a nest out of sticks, grass, weeds, leaves, moss, pine needles, rootlets, bark strips, hair, feathers, string, and other bits of trash. Sometimes they use snakeskin. Nests are dome-shaped with an entrance on the side.

James Politte (http://WashingtonDCMetroWeb.com)

Copyright, R. W. Scott, Birds in Flight

Copyright, Dr. William C. Alexander

Carolina Wrens are not picky about where they build, even though it’s usually in a shrub or vine. Other nesting places include tree stumps, old woodpecker holes, brush piles, and evergreen branches. Around people, wrens have used firewood stacks, boxes, mailboxes, tin cans, old shoes, window sills, and hanging plants to nest.

These birds are also known to make several nests in the same area; this may confuse predators trying to find out where the eggs are.

Carolina Wrens pair for life. Females lay four or five pinkish-white eggs, which hatch in about two weeks. Young wrens leave their nest in another two weeks.

Copyright, Eric Isley

The Carolina Wren’s most common foods are insects and spiders. They feed mostly on the ground, but will sometimes feed from tree trunks and branches. Sometimes they search in squirrels’ nests, which are usually home for many insects.

Some of the animal foods on the wren’s diet are: ants, bees, wasps, caterpillars, moths, leafhoppers, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets, cockroaches, flies, millipedes, isopods, snails, and all sorts of spiders. Occasionally, a wren will eat a tree frog or small lizard.

Some fruits and seeds eaten by Carolina Wrens include Poison Ivy, bayberry, Sweetgum, sumacs, acorns, pine, and a variety of weeds.

Copyright, Arlene Ripley, http://nestbox.com/intro.htm

Carolina Wrens have the same predators most birds have, such as hawks, owls, Blue Jays, crows, snakes, cats, and Raccoons.

Brown-headed Cowbirds are parasites, known for laying eggs in the nests of Carolina Wrens.

Additional Media

Description
Type
Credit
Carolina Wren Song
Sound
Bird Songs and Sounds from New Jersey

Relationships in Nature:

FOOD/PREY
PREDATORS
SHELTER
OTHER

Common Black Ground Beetle

Black Rat Snake

Eastern Redcedar

Brown-headed Cowbird Pa

Rabid Wolf Spider

Blue Jay

Virginia Pine

Downy Woodpecker SP

Spined Micrathena

Red-tailed Hawk

Eastern White Pine

Pileated Woodpecker SP

Chinese Mantid

Barred Owl

Loblolly Pine

Eastern Gray Squirrel FP

Eastern Bloodsucking Conenose

Raccoon

Greenbrier

Differential Grasshopper

Wild Grape

Field Cricket

Poison Ivy

Black Carpenter Ant

Switchgrass

Eastern Yellow Jacket

White Cushion Moss

Blue Bottle Fly

Virginia Creeper

Crane Fly

Bald-faced Hornet

North American Millipede

Isopod

Five-lined Skink

Spring Peeper

Northern Ringneck Snake

Poison Ivy

Sweetgum

Smooth Sumac

Relationship to Humans:

People often attract Carolina Wrens to birdfeeders. They are good to have in your yard, because they help control insect pests and provide beautiful song.

 
SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Animal
PHYLUM
Chordate
CLASS
Bird
ORDER
Passeriformes
FAMILY
Troglodytidae
GENUS
Thryothorus
SPECIES
Thryothorus ludovicianus

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