Bigtooth Aspen

Populus grandidentata

Copyright, Trees of Wisconsin

Copyright, The Ohio Department of Natural Resources and The Ohio State Universit Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, 2002

Bigtooth Aspen is a medium-sized tree that grows up to 60 feet tall. The trunk is one to two feet wide. It has rounded leaves about four inches long with large teeth. Leaves turn yellow in the fall.

Aspens get flowers early in the spring, before they get their leaves. Aspen flowers are called catkins. Catkins are 2 to 3 inches long, tan-colored, and droopy.

Later, catkins are replace with fruits. Bigtooth Aspen fruits have small seeds combined with silky hairs. They travel by wind to new places, where they may be able to grow into a new tree. One tree can make over a million seeds.

Bigtooth Aspens do not like shade. They usually grow on the edges of woods or along streams. They grow fast, but do not live long. These trees live for about 50 years.

Copyright, The Ohio Department of Natural Resources and The Ohio State Universit Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, 2002

Paul Wray, Iowa State University

The bark of Bigtooth Aspen is mostly smooth, gray, and thin. At the bottom of the trunk (the first three feet), there are orange furrows (wrinkles).

Bigtooth Aspens are often found with the following plants: Red Maple, Gray Birch, Eastern White Pine, Virginia Pine,American Beech, Eastern Redcedar, White Oak, Pin Oak, Basswood, Black Cherry, Sassafras, Flowering Dogwood, Black Willow, blueberries, Bracken Fern, Smooth Sumac, Witch Hazel, Mapleleaf Viburnum, Black Locust, and Wild Strawberry.

Copyright, The Ohio Department of Natural Resources and The Ohio State Universit Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, 2002

Bill Cook, Michigan State University

Copyright, Brooklyn Botanical Garden

Copyright, The Ohio Department of Natural Resources and The Ohio State Universit Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, 2002

Bigtooth Aspen often gets crowded out by Red Maple, Eastern White Pine, and oaks.

Aspens are an important food source for many animals, and are the favorite food of Beaver. Beaver eat twigs, leaves, and bark. They also used branches to make dams.

White-tailed Deer, Muskrat, and Eastern Cottontail eat leaves and twigs.

Buds are eaten by Purple Finch. Seeds are eaten by Carolina Chickadee and American Goldfinch.

Mourning Cloak, Viceroy, and European Gypsy Moth all eat leaves and use Bigtooth Aspen as a host plant.

Meadow Voles eat bark.

Aspens are often used by Hairy Woodpeckers and Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers for making nest cavities. Later, other animals will use the cavities, such as squirrels, Great Crested Flycatchers, and Black Rat Snakes.

Aspens are host for many fungus parasites, including Artist's Conk, Honey Mushroom, Oyster Mushroom, and False Tinder Polypore.

Other mushrooms have a special relationship that helps aspens, including Fly Agaric and Red-capped Scaber Stalk. This is called a mycorrhizal relationship, where the fungus and the tree give each other nutrients.

Relationships in Nature:

Animals Using as Food Source

Animals Using as Shelter

Associations With Other Plants

OTHER

Beaver

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Red Maple

Artist's Conk Pa

Eastern Cottontail

Beaver

Eastern White Pine

Honey Bee Po

Muskrat

Mourning Cloak

American Beech

Oyster Mushroom Pa

White-tailed Deer

European Gypsy Moth

Eastern Redcedar

Mourning Cloak Pa

Mourning Cloak

Raccoon

White Oak

European Gypsy Moth Pa

European Gypsy Moth

Virginia Opossum

Black Cherry

Eastern White Pine EC

Meadow Vole

Wild Turkey

Sassafras

Red Maple EC

Eastern Gray Squirrel

Flowering Dogwood

White Oak EC

Black Rat Snake

Black Willow

Great Crested Flycatcher

Highbush Blueberry

Bald Eagle

Bracken Fern

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Smooth Sumac

Witch Hazel

Wild Strawberry

Virginia Pine

Black Locust

Gray Birch

Pin Oak

Relationship to Humans:

People use Bigtooth Aspen wood to make pulp (paper), boxes, and crates.

 

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Plant
DIVISION
Magnoliophyta
CLASS
Magnoliopsida
ORDER
Salicales
FAMILY
Salicaceae
GENUS
Populus
SPECIES
Populus grandidentata

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