Asian Tiger Mosquito

Aedes albopictus

Copyright, Sean McCann, Creative Common License

The Asian Tiger Mosquito is a non-native species which is rapidly spreading across America. It was first discovered in Northern Virginia in 1997.

You can tell this mosquito apart from other mosquitos be the silvery-white bands on its legs and thorax (middle body section).

Copyright, Chris Paradise, Davidson Biology Website

Like all mosquitos, the Asian Tiger must lay its eggs in water, however it only needs 1/4 inch depth to complete its life cycle. It takes the larvae only five to ten days after hatching to go into the pupa (resting) stage. About two days later, the adult mosquito is born.

Asian Tiger Mosquitos will lay eggs in anything that collects water. Some common egg sites are: old tires, flowerpots, buckets, rain gutters, old soda cans, birdbaths, and kiddie pools. Mosquitos also lay eggs in tree holes and leaves which have collected water.

Eggs can also overwinter, meaning they will stay in water when it gets too cold to hatch, and continue their life cycle in the Spring.

Asian Tiger Mosquitos feed day and night, especially early in the morning and late afternoon. Male mosquitos, as well as very young mosquitos, are vegetarian and eat plant matter. Female mosquitos drink blood from humans, domestic and wild mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and birds.

Mosquitos are attracted to carbon dioxide, a warm gas that warm-blooded animals breathe out. Mosquitos are also attracted to some people more than others. They feed by inserting their needle-like mouthpart, called a "proboscis," into the skin. Many mosquitos spread diseases carried in their saliva.

Image Provided by Classroom Clipart

Copyright 2004, Richard L. Leung

Fortunately, mosquitos have many predators, including: birds, bats, frogs, toads, fish, salamanders, and other insects.

Additional Media

Description
Type
Credit
Many Larvae Swimming in Water
Video
Virginia Tech Entomology Department
Single Larva Swimming
Video
Mark Moran
Single Larva Swimming (Long)
Video
Mark Moran
Pupa in Water
Video
Virginia Tech Entomology Department
Adult Mosquito Feeding on Human
Video
Virginia Tech Entomology Department
Mosquito Life Cycle Diagram
Link to Printable Diagram
EnchantedLearning.com
Mosquito's Head Under a Microscopev #2
Link to Image
Uglybug.org
Mosquito's Head Under a Microscope #2
Link to Image
Uglybug.org

Download Quicktime if you are unable to play video

Relationships in Nature:

PREY/FOOD
PREDATORS
SHELTER
OTHER

Red Fox

Chigger

Yellow Pond Lily

Red Fox H

Meadow Vole

Eastern Dobsonfly

Common Duckweed

Meadow Vole H

Raccoon

Spined Micrathena

Common Cattail

Raccoon H

Eastern Cottontail

Creek Chub

Pickerelweed

Eastern Cottontail H

Red-winged Blackbird

Crayfish

Commoon Reed

Red-winged Blackbird H

Common Crow

Wood Frog

Lizard's Tail

Common Crow H

Human

Greater Bladderwort

Tussock Sedge

Human H

Least Shrew

American Toad

Long-leaf Pondweed

Least Shrew H

Eastern Gray Squirrel

Green Darner

Hydrilla

Eastern Gray Squirrel H

Eastern Chipmunk

CommonWater Strider

Greater Bladderwort

Eastern Chipmunk H

Muskrat

Yellow Perch

Muskrat H

Beaver

Eastern Newt

Beaver H

Virginia Opossum

Tesselated Darter

Virginia Opossum H

White-tailed Deer

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

White-tailed Deer H

Striped Skunk

Big Brown Bat

Striped Skunk H

Woodchuck

Golden Shiner

Woodchuck H

Southern Leopard Frog

Spring Peeper

Black and Yellow Argiope

Spotted Salamander

Eastern Mosquitofish

Relationship to Humans:

Asian Tiger Mosquitos are considered great pests and dangerous carriers of disease. They provide little use to humans other than as a food source to more desirable animals. Some diseases they have been associated with include: encephalitis and dog heartworm.

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Animal
PHYLUM
Arthropod
CLASS
Insect
ORDER
Diptera
FAMILY
Culicidae
GENUS
Aedes
SPECIES
Aedes albopictus

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