Artist's Conk

Ganoderma applanatum

Bev Wigney: The Magickcanoe Website (http://magickcanoe.com)

Artist's Conk is a large polypore, also called a "shelf mushroom." Polypores are wide and flat, and they usually grow on tree trunks or on the sides of stumps and fallen logs.

Artist's Conk can grow up to 20 inches wide. They have a woody feel and are rough and horny. Usually, they are fairly flat, but sometimes they are hoof-shaped.

These fungi are gray to brownish in color, but can be green when covered with algae or moss.

Artist's Conks grow year-round. You can discover how old they are the same way you can a tree. By cutting it in half, you can count layers. Each layer represents a year.

Artist's Conk can grow by itself or in small groups. They grow on dead wood, and sometimes on wounds in living trees. When it grows on living trees it is a parasite.

This fungi weakens the wood it grows on, making places for insects and woodpeckers to start holes.

Copyright, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service

Bev Wigney: The Magickcanoe Website (http://magickcanoe.com)

Copyright, George Riner, Boston Mycological Club

Artist's Conk grow on many types of trees, especially maples, alders, birches, beech, apple, poplars, cherry, plum, oaks, willows, and elm.

This fungi gets its name because when you flip it over you can carve writing or pictures in it. The picture will stay in the fungus and cannot be erased.

Like all fungi, Artist's Conk releases spores, which travel by wind and may grow into new fungi.

Artist: Nancy Korslin of the Wisconsin Mycological Society (from TomVolkFungi.net)

Copyright, Clive Shirley

Relationships in Nature:

Animals Using as Food Source

Animals Using as Shelter

Associations With Plants

OTHER

Horned Fungus Beetle

Silver Maple

Silver Maple H

Fungus Gnat

American Beech

American Beech H

Black Cherry

Black Cherry H

Black Oak

Black Oak H

White Oak

White Oak H

Willow Oak

Willow Oak H

Red Maple

Red Maple H

American Elm

American Elm H

Black Willow

Black Willow H

Downy Woodpecker FA

Pileated Woodpecker FA

Dogwood Borer FA

Bigtooth Aspen H

Relationship to Humans:

As described above, Artist's Conk can be used to carve pictures and words. This fungus is not edible.

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

KINGDOM
Fungi
DIVISION
Basidiomycota
CLASS
Hymenomycetes
ORDER
Aphyllophorales
FAMILY
Polyporaceae
GENUS
Ganoderma
SPECIES
Ganoderma applanatum

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